Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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January 14, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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January 14, 1998
 

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E i o Bowl! foOd for fans/ Cl BOys hoOps keep on winning/Bl Islanders’ top books of 1997/04 Reflections contest winners/C6 National Monuiaci Mercer Island REPORTER Wednesday, January 14, 1998 Mercer Island, Washington 75 cents What adeal! you make. tame the Mercer Island ,. tree. he. department has 00:: as smoke detectors 9 give astray; compliments of RadldShaok. They’re on a haemafirstrserved basis, . mm by sadistictalentuptssome steer latend young people, head tattle Reflections cer- e at»? _p.m.liornorrow 'h an; 15, iatthe library at; ‘ tMiddie‘Schoolfihe unafra'lnfinusicwilaetmnn' atnesLWirining entries homgraphywandvisuai arts presentedin a: slide g “his year, thes'th‘eme} r statesman north and, L ‘ asmoke‘ detector, ‘ arable daily from_:_8,a.m. to ‘ MEE Matt Brashcars/Mercer Island Reporter New Mercer Island Mayor Gordy Edberg is an architect with Edberg Christiansen and Heidenreich, a firm on Western Avenue in downtown Seattle. Architect, activi Edberg now adds ‘mayor’ to his resume By Jeff Gove Mercer Island Reporter ewly—elected Mayor Gordy Edberg Nhas some big shoes to fill. Over the . past four years, former mayor Judy Clibbom managed to make this normally part-time position her full—time vocation, representing the city at local and regional functions, attending Chamber of Commerce luncheons and interacting with the com- munity on a daily basis. When she decid- ed to step down as mayor, the community knew that none of the other council mem— bers, who all have full~time jobs besides serving as elected officials, could match her commitment of time. “Clearly I’m unable to devote the amount of effort and time that we enjoyed with Judy,” says Edberg, as he ponders how he’ll redefine the mayoral position. “I’m still formulating some of that in my mind.” But Edberg isn’t worried about shirk— ing his responsibilities. Being an effective mayor will be a matter of reorganizing his schedule, he says, and remembering to del- egate when necessary. Originally from St. Paul, Minn, Edberg moved to the Island in 1981 after a six- Ideefo year stint in Anchorage. Alaska, where he managed Edberg sees the His first experience with Island politics came when I I ' f ‘Mt , ' . L V‘ itinrndeiggtaiifisiiiiifi conmeed, a‘Lrian‘SintE‘ifiiiiiiidtoiiiti: tectural figm. Thie 1tiompa— reVltahzatlon 0f Plunging Eatinmission. a I .‘i ‘ ' ny trans erre 1m 0 the downtown pos c t or 91x ycrrs Seattle to open a new of- fice, and he and his wife Sharon chose the Island for their children, Kyle, 27 and Kimberly, 26, who were in grade school at the time. “There was only one place where I wanted my kids to finish their education and that was Mercer Island,” he says. “Who would have ever thought at that point that I’d end up mayor of the place?” But Edberg didn’t come to the Island without some experience in public life. At the time he lived in Anchorage, Alaska was still building the oil pipeline and the state was booming. Opportunities to get involved in civic activities were abundant and Edberg served on the first board of di— rectors of the public radio station in Anchorage. When he moved here, he want. ed to continue to serve his community. CHILD School By Malcolm Seymour Special to the Reporter Just next door to the homes of many Island residents is a small school that has earned the accolades of teachers and students throughout the community -- and even the nation -- and will be honored with a Golden Apple award for edu— cational excellence by KCTS later this month. The Children's Institute for Learning Differences, CHILD School for short, founded by Bellevue resident Trina Westerlund in 1977, has been on Mercer Island since 1993, offering educational programs to approximately 70 special—needs chil- dren at the elementary and middle school levels. “CHILD is intervention for some kids, a step- ping stone for others, and a safe place for every- body," said Westerlund, who now acts as the school's program director. CHILD will receive $500 and a $3,000 schol- arship will be awarded to the student of Westerlund‘s choice. ‘ She has previously received educator of the year awards from the Washington State Learning Disabilities Association, the National Learning Disabilities Association and the Lions Club and CHILD has beenrecognized by the mayor of Bellevue as an excellent program. Andrew Stites, a 10-year—old fourth grader in the program, commented on what the school had done for him. “I think those other schools I‘ve been to. . . they each affected me differently. This one’s helped me most with my reading, learning and behavior problems.” Stites continued, “All the teachers help as much as they can, being positive, building on right behaviors.” Andrew has been enrolled in the school for a year and a half, and spoke of be- havioral changes he has already noticed in him— self. “I used to make fun of other kids that had problems I didn't know about. . . now some of Please see CHILD on A6 business district as one of his major concerns. “That‘s where I felt my professional knowledge could come into action,” he remembers. In 1984 Edberg left the company that brought him to Seattle and started his own firm, now called Edberg, Christiansen and Heidenreich Architecture. They specialize in munici- pal buildings, airline and airport facilities and government work for the Coast Guard and the Navy. Recent projects include fire stations for the city of Kent and interior design work on VIP lounges for Alaska Airlines. His work experience, he says, should help him lead the city through several upcoming capital projects, including a new fire sta— tion, a regional transit facility and a new community center. Please see Mayor on A6 only 10 schools in the state. Trina Westerlund, director of The Children’s Institute for Lea Island school for children with special learning needs, stands in a classroom in her school, which will be honored with a Golden Apple Award this month. The award is given to Cornin g soon to your computer: the Virtual grocery store By Linda Morgan Mercer Island Reporter soccer practice after toiling all day at your job. Dinner must be on the table in time to make an evening meeting and ballet pick‘up ~— zind you're entertaining six tomorrow night for dinner. Sure. your husband will help he’ll change the light bulb over the dining room table. Maybe. Oh, for a grocery shopping genie to magically materialize from a crystal bottle. Or from a computer. Entrepreneur Mike Donald thinks he’s found that genie. With a few clicks, says Donald. shoppers can purchase everything from fresh tangerines to sirloin tip toast to dishwashing detergent Me and never leave their offices or homes. Donald. along with busi~ nessman Terry Drayton, has started HomeGrocercom. the first onvline grocery shopping and home deliv— ery service in the Seattle area. The Bellevue—hased ser— vice will begin next month in selected Eastside neigh~ borhoods, including Mercer Island. “Double income families are very busy they’re virtually time—starved," said Donald, who has spent more than 20 years in the grocery business. “There is an immense amount of excitement about this corn cept. It seems to be something everyone wants.” It’s not enough that you have to run the kids to Please see Groceries on An cook -- Gordy. Lawmakers listen to PTA priorities By Jeff Gove Mercer Island Reporter, The Washington State Constitution states that the Legislature has the paramount duty to fund education. Furthermore it stipulates that education across the state must be equal. So why is it that school districts have to pass levies to pay for things like text books and staff train- ing. and why are districts with supportive communities better able to raise that money? That’s just one of the issues area PTA members dis cussed with their lawmakers during a legislative round- table held at Mercer Island High School last Tuesday. The Island PTA hosted the meeting, which included parents, teachers and legislators from Seattle, the Eastside, Vashon Island and Shoreline. Island law» makers Senator Jim Horn and Representative Mike Wensman attended. The meeting was a chance for the participants to dis- cuss the Washington State PTA‘s top five issues for this year’s legislative session. which began Monday in Olympia. . At the top of the list was the PTA’s support of leg— islation to amend the way the state defines basic edu- Please see Lawmakers on A3 Matt Bras ears/MerCer slant! rning Differences, an t ‘2 was». ta».