Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
January 14, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
PAGE 11     (11 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 11     (11 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 14, 1998
 

Newspaper Archive of Mercer Island Reporter produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2021. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




tart LIFESTYLE your eye on Jer McHale You’ve probably Joel McHale perform he’s a regular on KING TV's “Almost Livel”. McHale, a 1991 graduate of Mercer Island High School, has added more performing to his overloaded schedule. Now a full— time grad student in the University of Washington’s School of Drama’s Professional Actors Training Program, the Youth Theatre Northwest alumnus is a cast member of the UW’s new play, “All Powers Necessary and Convenient.” Written by UW dra- ma pro- fessor Mark Jenkins and di— rected by Victor Pappas, associate V artistic di— rector of Intiman ' The... Linda “‘6 may MORGAN examines events ——~————— that took AROUND THE ISLAND place in 1948 when the Washing-ton State Legislature’s Un-American Activities Committee publicly at— tacked UW faculty and staff as Communists. McHale plays the role of the attorney for the profes~ sors. Performances are Feb. 4—15 at the Playhouse Theater, 4045 University Way NE. in Seattle. To reserve tickets, call 206-543-4880. MiraMed opens store MiraMed International, which plans “Travel with a Cause” pro— grams to Russia, and MiraMed Institute, a Seattle-based public charity that provides humanitarian aid to Russia orphanages, have opened up MiraMed’s Uncommon Market, a store in Pioneer Square. “We decided that one of the best ways to help support the Institute was to show Seattle the incredible array of Russian craft arts and paintings,” said Dr. Juliette Engel, a former Island resident who founded both organi— zations in the early ‘90s. At least 10 percent 0f the pro- ceeds of each sale will go directly to the institute, she said. The Uncommon Market is lo- cated at 314 Occidental Street South. Hours are 12-5 pm. on, weekdays, 12-6 pm. weekends. Former Islander in Issaquah production Former Island resident and MIHS grad George Mount will play Valere in the Village Theatre production of “The Miser,” a play adapted and directed by Jeff Steitzer. The show runs Jan. 22— March 1. Mount is artistic director of Wooden O Theatre’s free summer Shakespeare at Luther Burbank Park program. He has directed and acted in their productions of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “TWelfth Night,” “Comedy of Errors” and “Much Ado About Nothing,” and has also worked for such theaters as Book—It, Annex, Theatre Schmeater and Unexpected Productions. Show times for The Miser are 8 pm. Wednesday-Saturday, and 2 pm. Sunday. Performances have ' been added on selected Sundays at 7 pm. and Saturdays at 2 pm. Tickets range from $18 to $28 and may be purchased by calling the box office at 425-392-2202. Travel writers at Writers on Stage Yearning to beta travel writer? Here’s your chance to learn travel tips from two of the best in the- field. Jim Molnar, travel editor of the Seattle Times, and Willie Weir, an actor, author and com- mentator for radio station KUOW, will speak at 7:30 pm. Jan 20 at the Community Center at Mercer View, at Writers on Stage, an evening sponsored by the Mercer Island Arts Council. . Molnar and Weir will share their insights about making-a trip a unique experience, and make suggestions about joumal-keeping and writing effective travel arti— cles. Weir, author of Spokesongs: Bicycle Adventures on Three Continents, has ridden his bicycle over 35,000 miles around the globe. Wednesday, January 14, 1998 This is it! Football frenzy finale —— Super Bowl Sunday. Every year, we get together with a group of friends and their families to eat, visit and watch football —— in that order. Twenty years ago, we started our Super Bowl culinary classic contest. We pick a food category and everyone whowants to participate brings their favorite recipe —— all prepared. We all vote (secret ballot, of course). When the game ends, the winners are an— nounced. The first year, the category was cheesecake — then each year, a new category was picked. Appetizers, salads, chocolate, cookies were all presented and devoured. We’ve had great fun doing this perhaps you’ll want to start your own “culinary classic.” We take turns hosting this annual sport- ing event. If it’s your turn, you also provide a light meal to go with the rest of the food. I like to serve a big pot of hearty chile, a large tray of fresh vegetables, a wheel of ‘ Cougar Gold cheddar cheese, cornbread and bowls of tortilla chips and several different kinds of salsas. Here are the recipes for a hearty, quick to prepare chile, a delicious hot crab dip, luscious lemon bars and my favorite Mercer Island Reporter recipe contest winner, Blue Cheese Crumble. I’ve also included a recipe for Cougar Gold Cheddar and Potato Soup, just in case you have any leftover (better to set aside a wedge, it disappears quickly). SUPER BOWL CHILE Serves 12 Left: Bridget House, 21 months, bottom, leans in to find out what the little boy sc of the library. Her sister Lauren, 4, plays in the rabbit’s ears above. The two girls ran to the sculpture when Gt ready for chips, 3 pounds lean ground beef (or 3 pounds of regular ground turkey) 12 ounce package Jimmy Dean hot sausage (optional) 1‘/z cups chopped yellow onion 3 cloves garlic, minced 72 cup chopped green pepper 1 package Taco Seasoning 2-3 Tablespoons chile powder 2 27-ounce cans of kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 28-ounce can of ready-cut, peeled tomatoes 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes, Italian Style 1 32-ounce bot- tle V8 juice B r o w n t h e ground beef, 1 pound at a time in a large frying pan. Transfer to large soup pot! do the same with the sausage. Saute onions and garlic until soft. Add to pot with ground beef. Stir in Taco seasoning and chile pow- der. . Add tomatoes, V8 juice and kidney beans, simmer over low heat for 30 minutes. LISA DUPAR’S CRAB DIP Lisa runs a very successful catering busi- Who owns the sprea ness. This is one of her most requested recipes. , football fim Matt Brashears/Merccr Island Reporter Super Bowl Sunday always means chips and beer. But for something different, try one of food columnist Sharon Kramis’ Super Bowl soups. Searching for a sporty menu? Try these ideas 3 Tablespoons wine vinegar 1 Tablespoon lemon juice ‘/2 cup chopped red onion 1 cup finely chopped yellow onion 1 pound crab meat ‘/2 Tablespoon chopped garlic 1 cup Cara Mia marinated artichokes, drained and chopped , 2 cups grated Parmesan cheese 1V2 cups sour cream 1 cup mayon- naise 3 egg yolks Mix all ingredi- ents together in a large bowl. Transfer to a 2 quart baking dish. Bake at 350 de- grees for 25 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve with Crostinis or sliced French bread. * Note: to make crostinis, slice a French baguette intols inch thick slices. Place on a baking sheet. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with Italian Herb Seasoning. Bake at 375 degrees until crisp and lightly golden. BLUE CHEESE CRUMBLE 8 ounce blue cheese 1 cloves garlic, minced 1/3' cup olive oil 74 cup minced parsley freshly ground pepper Crumble blue cheese. Sprinkle into 8 inch shallow dish. Scatter over garlic. Pour over olive oil, wine vinegar and lemon juice. Top with red onion, parsley and pepper. Serve with sliced Granny Smith apples and Triscutt crackers. LARRY BROWN’S LEMON BARS Makes 2 to 3 dozen Larry added the flavor of almonds to this popular cookies. The nuts are toasted in a skillet, then ground in a food processor un- til nearly the consistency of almond butter. '/2 cup blanched almonds 3/4 cup butter, softened 3/4 cup powdered sugar, divided 5 eggs, divided ' 2% cups flour, divided 2 cups granulated sugar 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice Grated peel of 1 lemon 1/2 teaspoon baking powder Place almonds in a skillet and stir over p medium heat until they turn golden brown. Place in the work bowl of a food processor and grind until almost spreading consisten- Please see Sunday on C2 Island’s art? Matt Brashears/Iviercer Island Reporter ulpture is reading in front By DeAnn Rossetti Mercer Island Reporter s Islanders gaze at the grow— ing number of sculptures and displays that line walking paths, dot local parks, and perch be— fore buildings, some may wonder, whose art is it anyway? Actually, there are several kinds of outdoor art displays on Mercer Island: the privately—owned sculp— tures purchased by a business and placed on display on their property; sculptures owned by the City of Mercer Island that are on permanent display and not for sale; and sculp— tures displayed along the 1-90 Outdoor Art Gallery just north of the Town Center, which are for sale and aren’t permanent. Two of the newest pieces of pub- lic art on Mercer Island are a little girl sculpture, called “Stepping Forwar ” by Dennis Smith and an accompanying sculpture of a dog called “Playful Pup” by'Gary Price. Both were donated by Marj and Loyal Moore, the former to honor Louise Matzke, a longtime friend of the Moores who lived on Mercer Island and died suddenly three years ago. There are more pieces of perma— nent public art than people might re“ alize. “I would urge people to get a listing of the 10 permanent pieces,” said Rosalie King, head of the pub- lic art committee of the Mercer Island Arts Council. King also noted that the Mercer Island Arts Council will be starting another art installation soon, at the base of Gallagher Hill, which runs from 40th down to City Hall. The MIAC will be looking for a permanent site, and will do a call for artists after meeting and deciding what kind of art they want. EXAMPLES of “public” art owned by businesses art works are the sculpture (Untitled) that stands in front of the QFC, created by Richard Beyer, or “A Boy and His Alligator” in front of McDonalds. “Between Two worlds,” otherwise known as the rabbit outside of the Mercer Island Public Library, is an example of art that is owned by the City of Mercer Island,“and on permanent display. The piece entitled “Youth” (bronze , group) by Boris Spivak is displayed alongthe 1-90 Corridor, and is for sale for $15,000. With the exception of “Primavera II" all the art along the corridor is for sale, and is not their mother opened the library doors to head for the car. Right: Two new bronze sculptures stand just off North Mercer Way at the Park on the Lid: “Stepping Forwar ” and “Playful Pup,” created by Dennis Smith and Gary Price, respectively, were donated by Loyal and Marj Moore. “Playful'Pup” is dedicated to the memory of Nancy Mottet, a long— time Mercer Island resident and artist. Call Amanda Clark for infor- mation, 236-05 17. Please see Art on . .AAAAA