Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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February 2, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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February 2, 1994
 

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n. p l.‘ 3“: .4 ,scv a“? ' « Jar/yr mwww WWW? X.W:yx,{»:v v ,. A4 Mercer lsland Reporter lWednesday. February 2, 1994 {£33 ‘5‘ 730' “’5’” .. of l l r 774*? s" \ ’7}? Q . . , .‘fi ‘ , r’ “if , 1’: s , “it-Q “‘li‘ \ we“ in: \g. 'nie 10vunit Watercourse Place development includes three duplexes and a fourplex. Access will be via a new road to be constructed off of Southeast 36th Street. Tothouses get approval Years of debate slowed project By Chris Norred Mercer Island Reporter Construction of 10 new town- houses on land behind the Ogden Building on Southeast 36th Street may start this spring, the Mercer Island Design Commission ruled recently. The approval came last week after four years of debate over controversial plans to build a nar- row road along a steep bank to reach the new homes. Developer and builder Mike Mumm said neighbors oppose the project and have refused permis- sion to share a nearby private road. The new townhouses will be called Watercourse Place. Con— struction is expected to start by May, pending final engineering of the roadway. The project includes three duplexes and a fourplex. The units will sell for $350,000 and above. “It’s very low density and it’s built around the land,” said Mumm. “That’s the whole theme of Mercer Island.” Mumm, 46, bought the proper- ty from a group of investors about five years ago. The land was di— vided sometime in the early 19605 and a single house on the property .was demolished. The controver- ans nxeo ‘lYR. ARM ‘ 4.35mi n. ;- ~ v .‘~\ -. . . vetidl‘nx‘sm‘h‘hwnet .gst‘ « . w: an road «was mapped anagram lids limited... but it was never built. In 1989, the City Council grant- ed a change in zoning to allow townhouses on the 1.5 acre site. But a few months later, the De- sign Commission voted against the project, citing concerns about the narrow road, especially for fire trucks, and pedestrian safety. In response, the builder tried to redesign his project. One de- sign called for stretching 96th Avenue north from the Mercer Wood Estates neighborhood. An- other design called for sharing a road through the East Mercer Park neighborhood to the west. IN EARLY 1990, the Design Commission recommended shar- ing the road with East Mercer Park. But that is a private road. Mumm said he met with neigh- borhood representatives and even walked door-to-door through East Mercer Park trying to convince the homeowners to endorse his plan for sharing the road. But they refused. The townhouse project stalled for about three years while the company, MJ M General Contrac- tors, finished other projects and considered options. In recent months, brought his plan back to City Hall with a design that called for using the controversial roadway. The road will stretch 290-feet from Southeast 36th Street, past the Ogden Building to the new townhouses. 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Pay-Off SAVE UP TO $200,000 in mm. mo meant nvuem: even me use or voun LOAN «. a; V1" Minot" .. m 0 FREE 60 DAY RATE LOCK : ' ~95%0WN£R OCCUPIED '095%,OWNER OCCUPIED ' 80% CASH BACK REFINANCING 103650.000 ' 80% NO lNCOME VERIFY LOANS/SELF-EMPLOYED PURCHASE LOANS . RATE/TERM REFINANCE armada/WWW raw/.5» 4' :‘t’llfil‘ll Mortgage (,Iorpo *alion l»hllll_87llml‘itl78 ll Ii Lll‘lV’ U ii 451-8741 Mumm 4/ port the road on the steep hank. On the uphill side, the road will run beside the 13-foot rock wall , that supports the Ogden Building parking lot. On the downhill side, a guardrail will keep drivers from steering over a 10-foot retaining wall keeps the road from sliding into the drainage ravine. Mumm said engineers assure him the road can be built safely. At the City Hall meeting Jan. 26, attorneys for the Ogden Build- ing and the president of the East Mercer Park Homeowners Asso- ciation testified against the new townhouse project. The opponents cited concerns that construction could cause a‘ slide on the steep hillside that would endanger the Ogden Build- mg. The Design Commission voted 7-0 to allow the new townhouses if the developer meets several con- ditions. The conditions include a minimum 11—foot walkway along the new road and some landscap- ing requirements. Young artists are winners in Reflections competition Awards were handed out last week to more than 60 Mercer Is- land students, all winners in the 1993 PTA Reflections contest. The 16 first place winners will g onto compete at the state level. The Reflections program rec- ognizes and rewards students in grades K-12 for their original ar- tistic works in four categories: lit- erature, music, photography, and visual arts. The theme for this year’s competition was “It I Could Give the World a Gift...” FIRST, SECOND, and third place winners in the visual arts primary division (grades K-3) are all students at West Mercer Ele- mentary School. Jesse Riebe’s “Help for the World” won first; Elizabeth van Oppen’s “Gift of Food for All” won second; and Sean Sussex’s “If I Could Give the World a Gift” won third. Honor- able mention went to Jill Storlie, of Lakeridge Elementary School, for “If I Could Give the World Mermaids.” In the intermediate division for visual arts, grades +6, Lakeridge’s Tom Safarewicz won a first place award for “Happy Life.” Second place went to West Mercer’s Ryan White for “No Dis- crimination,” and third place was won by Oliver Valle Wright, an Is- lander Middle School student, for “Peace is in the Sky.” There were 13 honorable men- tions in this category. Kelsey Smith and Finley Wise, both from Island Park Elementary School, received awards for “The Gift of a Beautiful Colorful Flower” and “When You Put Your, Mind to IT,” respectively. Five West Mer- cer students winning honorable mentions were: Blake Riebe, for “Broccolli Print”; Aaron Seeks, for “World Peace”; Joey Solazzi, for “The Gift of Nature”; Evan Bailly for “Rain Forest”; and Amanda Reynold for “Sunrise of World Peace.” Lakeridge student winners were Julie Congalton, for “Recycling Star a Gift to the World,” and Allison Shepard, for “...There Would be no Pollution.” IMS students Matt Grant and Margot DuBey won for their en- tries, “Sunset” and “My Gift,” respectively. There were three winners in the junior high division (grades 7-9) of visual arts, and two win- ners in the high school division (grades 10-12). At the middle school, Morgan Wise won first place for “I’d Give the Mountains a New Face — Part I.” Second place was taken by Katrina Marie Wible for “Classical Baby,” and third place went to Walther Chen for “World Peace.” Mercer Is- land High School student Shoshanah Landau won first place for an untitled piece, and MIHS’s Aaron Kiviat took a sec- ond place for “Lake of Clouds.” LITERATURE AWARDS went to the following students in the primary division: first place to Allison Rainey, Lakeridge, for “War no More”; second place to Kate Barach, Island Park, for “Marie’s Garden”; third place to Marit Featherstone, West Mer- cer, for “Peace”; and honorable mention to Stephanie Yuen, West Mercer, for “A Girl That Gave the World a Gift.” Winners in the intermediate di— vision were: first place to Kate Nickerson, IMS, for “A Smile”; second place to Amy Fritsch, IMS, for “If I Could Give the World a Gift”; and third place to Kathryn Leithe, Island Park, for “Gifts.” Honorable mentions went to IMS students Brian Ny- berg, for “If I Could Give the World a Gift, I Would Give it Back its Forests”; Elizabeth Lantz, for “My Gift Giver”; and Tiffany Reek, for “Friends Forever.” Seven IMS students won prizes in the junior high division for lit— erature. Ross Laing took a first place for “The Magical Place.” Second place went to Christina Cramer for “My Gift to the World,” and third place went to Elizabeth Whitney for “The Jelly and the Sugar Covered Donut!” Students awarded honorable men- tions were Adam Anderson, for “Another Chance”; Brook Katz, for “Eat No Meat”; Timmy Chung, for “The Gift of Pure Wa- ter”; and Lindsay Hampson for “A Gift From a Stranger.” First place in the high school division went to MIHS's Neal Pozner for “Dreams and Gifts.” Second place went to Lindsay Tsurusaki, MIHS, for “If I Could Give the World a Gift...Rain.” YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHER Julie Chung, from West Mercer, won an honorable mention for “Good Eyes” in the primary divi- sion of the photography category. In the intermediate division, awards went to the following: first place to Katie Slepyan, IMS, for “Mountain High Budda”; sec- ond place to Becky Rowley, West Mercer, for “Something Warm to Hug”; third place to Caitlin Frisch, West Mercer, for “Heal the World.” ‘ IMS student Timmy Chung swept the photography awards in the junior high division, winning a first place for “Fresh Water" and four honorable mentions, for “A Big Blue Blanket,” “A Day Off,” “Roofs of Art,” and “Time.” MIHS students winning in the high school division were Dorothy Slepyan, who took a first place for “The Guardian Angel”; Jamie Peschel, second place for “Light from Dark”; and Lindsay Kir- cher, third place for “The Lost People.” MIHS student Rachel Weiss- man won two honorable mentions for “Dazzling Daybreak” and “Peaceful Pondering.” And Aurah Landau won an honorable mention for “The Toll of the Working Man Yields Greater Op- portunity.” MUSIC AWARDS in the pri- mary division were won by Colin Godwin, Lakeridge, who took first place for “I’d Give 3 Lazy Sum- mer Day”; Bennett Addison, — Please see ‘Reflections’ on A5. 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