Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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March 9, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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March 9, 1994
 

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AZ Mercer Island Reporter goes wall to wall at high Andrea Marchese John Deininger, left, and Ken Taya show off Deininger’s wall mural in the 500 wing at Mercer Island High School. The two were among four seniorvlevel art students of teacher Cindy Jensen ,who created colorful giant-sized wall paintings in the high school corridors. They first did drafts on paper, then wall sketches, and finally filled in their creations with acrylic paint. ’ City council to hold weekend retreat Annual event will set city priorities for next year By Chris Norred Mercer Island Reporter The Mercer Island City Council will meet this weekend in Cama- tion for its annual retreat to dis- cuss issues facing city govern— ment and to set priorities for the coming year. The council will begin meeting at p.m. Friday. The retreat, which is open to the public, runs through 10 a.m. Sunday at the Idyl Inn on the River, 4548 Tolt River Road, Carnation. A marathon agenda for Satur- day, March 12, includes meetings from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. with breaks for lunch and dinner, which council members will cook themselves. r . On Saturday morning, Deb Symmonds, city director of ad. mmistrative services, will report on Mercer Island and the “infer. motion superhighway.” That afternoon, council mem— bers will review a six-year budget forecast and discuss policies for the 1995-96 budget. At retreats in recent years the City Council has produced a list of priorities that guide the work and policies at City Hall throughout the year. For example, a poster on the wall of City Manager Paul Lanspery’s office at City Hall to- day lists the top goals of the City Council from the 1993 retreat. Mayor Judy Clibborn said she expects similar results this year. “If you’re setting goals, and trying to do Visioning and set pri- orities for the year, you need to have the luxury of time,” Clibborn said. When the council meets at City Hall, she said, members face pressure to finish their meeting and go home or go back to work. At a retreat, they eliminate that pressure by setting aside a full weekend for council business. “You get to explore LOTS OF NEAT LITTLE (v PAR4%TREE Bellow: Square 0 Upper We! 0 451.8035 things, and more than one person gets a chance to talk,” the mayor said. After the retreat, the council will prepare a report on its work and any decisions at the retreat. The report from Symmonds on high-tech opportunities for Mer— cer Island may prompt the most intriguing discussion of the week- end. For about three weeks, Symmonds has worked full-time researching programs in which communities around the nation have used digital computer and telephone information systems. Most of the intriguing high- tech programs involve entertain- ment and commercial services, such as video-on-demand or home banking, (Symmonds said. “Most: ly, the things being tried out are the things that people will pay for, of course}? Often, the programs are brOught to the communities by private enterprise and the 10- Su EQUITABLE mortgage corporation MENT 3 INVESTMENT MANAGE RESEARCH, me. “We “flim- . Sharing Our Knowledge With You - Lump Sum Distribution IRA Roll-Over Tax Deferred Investing Into Retirement 0 Income/Saving/Investment Need Analysis QR if you would like to attend our free tax and investment seminar Call Roger Bowlin at 232-2486 All meetings are confidential and informative its 305, Parkplace Kirkland,Wa 98033 cal governments have little or no involvement. Mercer Island is a fertile loca- tion for new programs using com- puter and communication tech nologies, Symmonds said. Mercer Islanders are more computer lit- erate than the general population. The Island’s cable franchise, Via- com, has installed fiber optic ca~ ble here. And the Island’s con- tract with Viacom is entering ne- gotiations for renewal. AT THE RETREAT this week- end, City Council members also will hear a report on City Hall staff groups who are trying to save taxpayer money. Six different committees have been working over the past year. The committees have studied the City Hall salary system, service priorities, contracts and consul- tants, performance reviews, staff management“ w. new I revenue sources and workforeerjshafing ’f‘We’re-trying to comelup, With alternative ways to ' do. business , and save money,” said Paul Lanspery, city manager. . ; Also at the retreat, the City 2486 Roger-W. Bowlin I Financial Adviser Remodel and Construction Loans Available HOME LOANS 6.875 I 7.375 7.375 15 years 30 years 30 years 203,000 203.000 600,000 Please call us to review any and all financirég options. Our twolm year on Mercer lslan Inland Office Plaza, 2737 77th Ave., 8.E., Suite 101, Mercer Island, WA 98040 (206) 236-1268 cowweu. BANKER E3 BAIN, ASSOCIATES iv rlo Hobbs ‘ wssrcnssr OPEN SUNDAY, MARCH 13 o 1pm -4pm Two new homes built by Mercer Construction and Development. Priced at $875,000 and $895,000 with stupen- dous views cf the lake, city and Olympic Mountains. These homes are designed to accommodate a variety of lifestyles. They are open, light and elegant yetcomfortable. We are proud to represent this fine product and invite you to stop by and judge for yourself. Remember to always call Jane Eagle and Kris Robbs for all your real estate needs. 232-4600 or 654-2967 access line. Council will consider a budget re- port from Finance Director Jo- anne Sylvis, who predicts a budg- et shortfall of nearly $300,000 in the year 2000 if revenue and ex— penditures continue on the cur- rent course. , Council members will discuss the budget predictions in Sylvis’ report and make their own pre— dictions of the city’s financial fu- ture. In fact, each of the council members has made predictions on the future of property taxes, sales taxes and payroll growth. Their predictions of Mercer Is- land’s financial picture in the year 2000 vary from a $225,000 shortfall to a $720,000 surplus. By the end of the retreat, the council is expected to reach some agreement on the future of cityfi— nances and that agreement will guide City Hall staff as they write the preliminary, two-year budget , for 1995-96. j NEW EXPRESSHN’“ Wednesday, March 9, 1994 Fine Arts Showcase set for next week Annual event features student art, performances The whole community is invit- ed to the Mercer Island School District’s 15th annual artistic ex- travaganza, the Fine Arts Show- case, on Wednesday, March 16, at Mercer Island High School. This year’s showcase has the theme, “ArtsEcology,” and fea- tures student artwork, instrumen- tal, vocal and dramatic perform- .ances. The showcase is the pri- mary fundraiser for Mercer Is— land’s highly regarded music and visual arts programs. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for art viewing. Informal performances in the main building are from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Performances in the gym are at 6:45 and 8:15 p.m. The 6:45 performance features Mercer Island King County, $36 per year. Jane Meyer Editor Photographer: Andrea Marchese Office: Joan Allen Circulation: Steve Bridal DEADLINES: Office Hours: 8 a.m. to p.m. weekdays Has Openings for Pro-school and for Day Care Open 6:30-6:30 EPORTER ‘ 7845 as. 30th Street o 13.0. Box 38 o Mercer Island, WA 98040 232— 1 2 1 (News 87. Display Advertising) 4534240 (Circulation) The Mercer Island Reporter (USPS 339020) is published weekly every Wednes— day. Second—class postage paid at Mercer Island, Washington, Subscription rates by junior dealers and motor routes, $3.00 per month; $36 per year; by mail in Lorraine Swinford Advertising Sales Manager NEWS: Brock Longstreth, Chris Norred, Toby Then'ien, Mary Lou Willison ADVERTISING; DISPLAY, ads requiring proofs, noon Friday; special positions (lifestyle, sports, arts, special sections), 5 p.m. Friday; Phone 232-1215. CLASSIFIED: 3 p.m. Monday; Phone 455-2525 NEWS: Organizations, announcements, p.m. Friday; general news, most sports. p.m. Friday; Letters to the Editor, noon Monday. Phone 232—1215 the elementary choir, elementary strings, middle school cadet band, high school concert band and 7th grade choir. The 8:15 perfor- mance showcases the high school orchestra, symphonic band, choir and Harlequins drama group, as well as the middle school concert band, orchestra and 8th grade choir. Original posters, dessert and beverages may be purchased in the Mushroom. Tickets are $4 single, $12 fami- ly, $15 patrons, $30 silver patrons, and $50 gold patrons. Patrons re- ceive family tickets and a listing in the program. Silver and gold patrons also receive reserved seating. Deadline for advance ticket sales and reserved seating is to- morrow, March 10. Mail a check to 8848 SE. 74th Place, Mercer Is- land 98040. Tickets will also be available at the door. Linda Morgan Associate Editor LITTLE ACORN Dependable Responsible — Professional 1 Sensitive 236- 0480 Mercerview Community Center MERCERISLAND US ABOUT ‘1 We’ve discovered that some of the best ideas in business come from our small business customers. Cheryl and Spark VanWinkle, owners of Stadium FloWers, Inc. like the idea of getting the word on their line of credit in under three days. ’lhat’s why we’ve introduced ExpressLine — an afford- able line of credit especially for small businesses. A streamlined application process means you’ll hear if you’re approved a lot sooner. It also features an option of overdraft protection for your linked business checking account. The new ExpressLine is another choice from Seafirst And another better idea for business banking —- inspired by you. To make thel switch to Seafirst, call 1-800-461-0810 (in‘Seattle call 461-0810, ’lTY/TDD users call 1—800-232—6299) . ,1 l