Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 20, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 20, 1994
 

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A2 Mercer Island Reporter Car chase in CBD ends with arrest U-turn back onto 78th before Hagstrom could make the stop. With a chase in progress, the Wednesday, April 20,1994 Mercer 1.1....dREPORTER 7845 S.E. 30th Street 0 PO. Box 3’8» Mercer Island, WA 98040 232— I 2 1 5 (News 87. Display Advertising) 45341240 (Circulation) The Mercer Island Reporter (USPS 339020) is published weekly every Wednes' day. Second—class postage paid at Mercer Island. Washington, Subscription rates by junior dealers and motor routes, $3.00 per month; $36 per year; by mail in Morgan gets awards Linda Morgan, associate edi- tor of the Mercer Island Report- er, swept the features story cat- egory in the Washington Press Association’s “Challenge of Ex- cellence” competition for 1993. The annual WPA Awards rec- By Toby Therrien Mercer Island Reporter -4. s -- a- .— p-—-----—--_...v- ~- u---.— ---_--..-_---.. --------—‘——--”--—c~v-------_o--'-_.—¢—- vow—oar--- -. --—.—-----~_ -—------~— —-—v---—~”-—-—w~-n”<ocwoovu—-r'-.cvuwcqwon---cm--o-‘o-vacu..-w-.-.'.'"cu-Utcosuvttlvvfiv..-O‘COCIVQ'VD""'-'.‘O'OWW architects to find creative ways to come in under $800,000. . , . . A ~‘ ' keep costs down if they fees are Ziara said that if Jahncke had KITCHENAlD ASKO-ASEA SUB ZERO AMANA MB; based on the total prOJect cost. requested figures of him earlier ' MAYTAG ' SHARP BROAN GENERAL ELECTRIC 9_8 MON. FRI. than during the board meeting, he - VIKlNG ' MONOGRAM ' MODERN MAID THERMADOR S ED THURS ON MONDAY. Jahane t01d could have given him an estimate , DACOR , UMNE , HOTPOWT . , FRIGlDAlRE 9'5 TUE , W , the Reporte’mat he had 1°°ked at °f design “’5” Same As . GAGGENAU - WHIRLPOOL ~JENN AIR MlELE 9-5 SATURDAY the proppsed budget 0f 313090900 The board is tentatively ‘ ‘ I I for architectural and englneering planning to place on the caSh CLOSED SUNDAY saw“?- It cqnflmis my Pomt November ballot a bond measure ‘1 that we 1:? deahl‘g filth? blg in the $14 million range for number, he said: We re . . renovating the three schools. ’ bas‘cauy Relegatmg the decision Design fees would be included in ' to Staff: It .S.a matter 0f pUbhc that figure. At the outset of the accountability for the board to meeting a member of the scrutinize these numbers. Are we audiencé Myra Lupton gemng the; be“ deal. for our . requested that the ballot measure taxpayers' Delegatmg that kind state that if the state rebates aggigzfiigaet?finégzgcfiave any’ construction funds to the district, 1 f argument with the two architects tgigglgse returned to the selected. I just want to make sure _ V ' t . the process gives us the best deal Zlal‘a,t01dt1_1€ board the mlfidle j n for the dollars expended," school modernization prOJect is J A 21-year-old Issaquah man, driving a pickup truck he had stolen in Seattle 3 week before, was apprehended after leading police on a chase through the Mercer Island Central Business District and its noontime rush of traffic last Wednesday. The man climbed out of the truck and fled on foot after colliding with another truck and a concrete barrier lining the I-90 on- ramp at North Mercer Way and 76th Avenue S.E. He stopped after running 50 feet into the First Hill Lid and was then handcuffed. Also riding in the truck was a 37—year-old with no known address. Police searched the stolen truck and found the man’s backpack, which contained stolen checks, credit card receipts and a “drug kit,” with paraphernalia used for injecting heroin. The incident began around noon when Mercer Island Public Safety Officer Ken Hagstrom saw the truck driving northbound in the 2800 block of 77th Avenue S.E. Hagstrom had the dispatcher run a computer check on the license plate, which alerted police that the truck was stolen. After turning around, he found the truck parked at McDonald’s and eventually followed it onto 78th Avenue S.E. Hagstrom said he was biding his time, waiting for other officers to arrive. But when the truck turned into the parking lot at Baskin & Robbins, Hagstrom decided to act. “There’s only one entrance to the lot,” said Hagstrom, “sol thought I could pull in behind him and he wouldn’t be able to get out.” Instead, the man made a hard man started driving directly into oncoming traffic. He pulled through a bank parking lot and began weaving north through the southbound traffic on 77th Avenue S.E. The man told police after he was arrested that he hoped to cause an accident, thinking the police would stop to take care of the people involved. At one point, he narrowly avoided running head-on into a garbage truck. With the heavy noontime traffic, Hagstrom almost called off his chase. “If the traffic was any heavier once we got past S.E. 27th Street, I would have stopped,” Hagstrom said. “But it opened up again. There weren’t that many cars.” The man led Hagstrom onto North Mercer Way and made a dash for the on—ramp leading into the First Hill Lid, where he clipped another truck and veered into a concrete barrier. He jumped out of a shattered window as the truck was still rolling to a stop. Both the man and his woman passenger woman claimed to be hurt, but an examination at the Harborview Medical Center revealed no injuries and they were released into police custody. The man has been charged with felony eluding, first and third degree possession of stolen property for the truck and checks, forgery, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mercer Island detectives are also checking with a U.S. district attorney into possibly charging the man with mail theft, since it appears he had been stealing checkbooks and credit cards from mailboxes. School calendar gets tentative approval By Laurie McHale Mercer Island Reporter Mercer Island students won’t go back to school this fall until Thursday, September 8, accord- ing to the tentative 1994-95 school calendar presented to the Mercer Island School Board last Thurs— day. Opening will be delayed be- cause of the high percentage of students likely to be absent on Sept. 6 and 7 for the Jewish High Holidays. Winter break will begin after school on Friday, Dec. 16. Mon- day, Jan. 2 is a holiday since New Year’s Day falls on a Sunday, so students won’t return to school af— ter winter break until Tuesday, Jan. 3. The usual four-day Presi— dents’ Day weekend in February will be reduced to three days. The last day of school would be June 19, with any snow closure make- up days beginning on June 20. The release times for teacher planning half—days and elementa- ry parent conference days have been coordinated to ensure that high school students are available for day care. High school will be dismissed at 10:40 am; middle school, at 11:20 a.m.; and elemen- tary schools, at 12 noon. Grades K—12 teacher planning days will be Oct. 14, Nov. 7, Jan. 30, March 27 and May 1. In addi— tion, grades 6-12 planning days will be Dec. 5 and Feb. 27. Student release days have been scheduled for Mondays wherever possible, to assist parents in planning for day care. In addition, the elemen- ‘tai-y schools will help to coordi— nate signups for afternoon activi- ties offered by various Island or- ganizations. Elementary conference days will be Nov. 17—23. According to Mike Soltman, Director of In- structional Services, elementary teachers continue to feel that con- ferences are essential to their communication with parents. The district realizes, he said, that they have an impact on the quality of education, because of the many flours of school missed in Novem- er. The annual Metrathon will be held on Oct. 14, rather than later in the month when bad weather has been a problem in the past. While the calendar has not re- ceived final approval, the school district has reached tentative agreement with the teachers’ union, the Mercer Island Educa- tion Association, which must ap— prove it. The school board will vote on the calendar at its next meeting. Architects. . . Continued from A1 . contractual arrangement. “I can’t give you a percentage,” Ziara said. “There’s a combination of new construction and modernization at each site.” He said the fees are limited until after a cost comparison is complete, and there will be future requirements for the board to vote on the scope of the projects. Board member Boyd Vander Houwen accused J ahncke of seeing everything in terms of right and wrong, and of trying to micro-manage the district. David Rowe, a member of the board’s Facilities Advisory Committee, told the board that it would be to the district’s financial advantage to go for a fixed price on architectural services, in today‘s competitive environment among architectural firms. He said there was no incentive for Ziara told the Reporter Tuesday there is a fee structure for such services outlined in the state legal code. “Most school districts just follow that. It’s the accepted standard and it’s pretty hard to justify much deviation.” The fee structure bases design and engineering fees on a percentage of the project, with a sliding scale based on its magnitude. Responding to concerns expressed by J ahncke and Rowe, Ziara said it is not the architect’s responsibility to bring costs down, but to do what he is asked to do. “If the bids on the project then come in over bid, and we refuse to accept the bids, then it's the architect’s responsibility to go back and rework the design at no additional charge to the district.” Both firms chosen have extensive experience designing schools, Ziara said, adding that he anticipated the design fees would now about 40 percent complete. I 9 ognize outstanding work in all aspects of the media and com— munications fields. In the features category for non-daily newspapers in the Re- porter’s circulation category, Morgan took first place with her story, “Coping with multiple sclerosis.” Her story “Talented teens: Blending schools, sports, sonatas and Schubert,” won sec- ond place; and her group of sto- ries entitled “Teen drinking,” won third place. She also won first place for editing the Lifestyle section of the Reporter. Editor Office: Joan Allen DEADLINES: Linda Morgan King County, $36 per year. Jane Meyer Lorraine Swinford Advertising Sales Manager Circulation: Craig Collette, circulation manager Steve Bridal, district sales manager Linda Morgan Associate Editor NEWS: Laurie McHaIe, Chris Norred, Toby Thcrrien, Mary Lou Willison Photographer: Andrea Marchese ADVERTISING; DISPLAY, ads requiring proofs, noon Friday; special positions (lifestyle, sports, arts, special sections), 5 p.m. Friday; Phone 232-1215. CLASSIFIED: 3 p.m. Monday; Phone 455-2525 NEWS: Organizations, announéements, 5 p.m. Friday; general news, most sports, 5 p.m. Friday; Letters to the Editor, noon Monday. Phone 232—1215 Office Hours: 8 am. to 5 p.m. weekdays New dishwashers, refrigerators, and laundry are oniiheir way to. us and we must make room!! Hurry in for best selection!! We have remaining stock of and laundry as well as~ all remaining e t on all dishwashers L». . refrigerators and laundry!!!