Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 20, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 20, 1994
 

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r New pitching helps MI beat Woodinville By Toby Therrien Mercer Island Reporter yler Engvall has arrived on Mercer Island’s pitching mound, much to the delight of the overworked arms of Phil Boos and Scott Rye. Engvall a righthanded ju- nior who usually plants himself at first base when the Islanders take to the baseball field — pitched six innings against Woodinville Monday night. He held the Falcons to one run on six hits and two walks, picking up the Islanders’ third win of the season with a 4-1 effort. “We wanted to bring Tyler on slow,” said Islanders coach Mark Rye. To do that, Engvall threw some innings with the junior varsity. He made his 1994 Kingco Conference pitching de- but by holding the dangerous Lake Washington “Kangaroos to just two hits and a walk over two innings last Thursday. “He’s been doing the job. He’s in our starting rotation now as long as he continues to pro- gress,” said Rye. Boos and Engvall are now Mercer Island’s starting pitch- ers, allowing Rye to bring in his son Scott as a closer. Engvall’s emergence couldn’t have come at a better time, with the Islanders poten- tially facing four games in four days this week. His perfor— mance to start the week gave Boos an extra day’s rest. spring and in third place in the Crest Division race to the play— offs, with two fewer losses than Bellevue and Sammamish. Mercer Island faces two more crossover games this week before moving back into a Crest Division schedule that will prove crucial to their postseason chances. The Islanders travel to Peter Kirk Field in Kirkland to take on the 6-4 Juanita Rebels at 3:30 p.m. this afternoon. Thursday night Mercer Island travels to Pop Kenny Field to meet the surging Inglemoor Vikings at pm. AAA polls. runs, PROBABLY RYE’S toughest task this season has been con- vmcing his Islanders that they have a legitimate shot at mak- ing the Kingcotournament. Strange as it may seem, two losses have proved just how good this team can be. Early in the season, Mercer Island gave up to runs in the last inning and lost 4-3 to the Issaquah Indians, currently the second-ranked AAA baseball team in the state of Washington. Last Thursday night, the Is— landers hosted Lake Washing- ton, the third-ranked team in the After spotting the 91 Kanga— roos six runs and three home the Islanders exploded with six runs of their own on their final trip to the plate in the seventh inning. Pete McLean was hit by a pitch to lead off the inning and set the table for Jason Koehler’s revitalizing home run. (With the rally sparked, Boos followed with a walk. The Kan— llffffi S PORT 8 That winning attitue garoos then got two key grand— ball outs and appeared to be in the clear. Two infield errors kept the rally going. though, be- fore Kasey Thompson drove in two runs with a double and Schmidt tied the score with a single. That’s the way things stood until the tenth inning, when Lake Washington struck with two outs. Jeremy DeShazer doubled and scored on Ryan Mebust’s single. After a walk, Mebust crossed the plate on a single from Khalid Howard. “Those two games are really indicative of (how competitive we are),” said Rye. “The key to our season,” he said, “has been winning enough to be in playoff hunt. If we’re fortunate enough to get the Banker [shows he ’can throw a stick pretty far’ By Toby Therrien Mercer Island Reporter Mike Banker can’t help but make a quick comeback when other athletes make track the fo— cus of a belittling joke. “Sometimes people say, ‘50 Mike, what do you do? You throw a stick?”’ Banker said during last Thursday’s meet at Islander Sta- dium. “I just say, ‘Yeah, I throw a stick. But I can throw a stick pretty far.”’ Banker can indeed throw a stick. Actually, it’s the javelin, and Banker has thrown it farther than anyone else at Mercer Island High School. It happened at the Kingco Con- ference Track & Field Champion- ships at Lake Washington last spring. That’s when Banker re- leased a javelin that landed 168 feet later, setting the standard for any Islander who may come along,...including himself, since he’s still only a junior. Banker played soccer and baseball while growing up, but the team sports never really caught on. It wasn’t until his freshman year, when the state added the event to track meets, that he decided to try his hand at “throwing the stick.” “I saw it on the Olympics and it looked pretty awesome,” he Andrea Marchese ‘ Mercer Island High School junior Mike Banker holds the school record said. “It looks so graceful when with a javelin toss of 168 feet, a mark he set last spring. you do it right.” But it’s awfully hard .to look graceful and still pro- pel the javelin a great distance. “I have a school record, so people expect me to throw far every time,” said the easygoing Banker, who finished second last Thursday with a toss of 149-9 during the meet against Redmond and Lake Washington. “But it’s like learning it all over again each sea- son. Right now I feel like I’m doing pretty well for the amount of practice I’ve had.” While the arm acts as a catapult, Banker said he gets most of his power from his legs and torso.‘The arm is merely a slingshot, a conduit for the momen— tum built up in the dash to the line. As with hitting a baseball solidly, the best throws are free from struggle or strain. “When you throw it well, you feel like it went no- where because you feel like you didn’t do anything to it,” said Banker. “Everything comes together so nice and smooth. There’s no strain_or_ stress any— where. You look out and see the Javelin Just flying. “It’s a good feeling,” he added, “but those are rare.” It’s thatsmooth—as—ice release Banker has yet to experience this season. ' Most of the pieces are in place, but Banker’s front ' foot has been slipping when he plants it to throw, causing him to slide past the chalk scratch-line. “It happened a lot when I wasa freshman,” he said. “I get momentum and to stop that momentum you have to have a good plant. If you don’t dig in and plant you’ll scratch.” ‘ ’ Banker’s still refining, still looking for the perfect fit, the perfect throw. Just one more chance to say, “Yeah, but I can throw that stick pretty far.” Andrea Marchese Mercer Island’s Jason Koehler edges off first base before being caught for an out in the second inning against The Islanders are 3—5 this " Lake Washington last Thursday afternoon. Koehler rebounded with a rallyrsparking home run in the seventh. breaks and get into the playoffs, I really feel we can play with anybody.” AGAINST WOODINVILLE, Engvall was the recipient of the gem-like fielding of senior sec- ond baseman Saul Zuckerman, who made three diving catches to snare line drives and kill Fal- con rallies. At the plate, the Islanders scratched out runs the old fash— ioned way. Scott Rye singled to lead off two innings, eventually scoring in the first on a sacrifice fly from McLean, and again in the fifth on McLean’s single. Kyle Eng led off the third ‘with a double into the left field gap and scored on Schmidt’s single up the middle. And Koehl- er crossed the plate in the fourth on a single to right by Engvall. Wednesday, April 20.1994 Season’s first loss for soccer squad By Toby Therrien Mercer Island Reporter Should any team expect to make it through an entire Kingco Conference soccer season without a loss? With a 5-0-1 record mid- way through their schedule, the Mercer Island Islanders had their dreams. That is, until they meet a tal- ented team from Woodinville at Pop Kenney Field last Friday night. “You can’t keep on going and winning, especially here in the Kingco league. That happens,” Is- landers coach Frank Ceteznik said of Mercer Island’s 4-0 loss. “I’m disappointed, but I’m not devastated.” The Islanders have a right to be disappointed. They should not be disheartened. Actually, Mercer Island con- trolled the first 10 minutes of ac- tion, forcing the Falcons into an up-tempo, kick—and-run atmos- phere more suited to the Island— ers’ style of play. While Woodinville concentrat- ed on knocking around Mercer Is- land’s talented playmaker, junior midfielder Owen Pochman, the Is- landers were busy hustling to the ball and challenging the Falcons’ net. Ten minutes into the game, though, the tide turned with Woodinville settling into its profi- cient passing game. The Falcons controlled the ball for the rest of the first have, cracking the scoreboard with 23 minutes left when Mercer Island goalkeeper Gulliver Swenson was called for shoving a Woodinville player at the edge of the goalie’s area. Mark Collings lined the pen— alty kick into the left panel to start the scoring. — Please see ‘Soccer’ on B2. Barokas will play basketball at SPU Facing the prospect of playing basketball for his third school in four years, Charlie Barokas was interested in two things: He want- ed a scholarship and he wanted to stay in the area. Last week, Barokas got both wishes when he signed to play the next two seasons for Seattle Pa- cific University, an NCAA Divi- sion II program on the rise. Barokas originally signed with the University of California—Davis after graduating from Mercer Is- land High School in 1991. But after seeing limited play- ing time in one season and redshirting the next, Barokas transferred to Bellevue Communi- ty College, where he led the Helmsmen in scoring last season with 21 points per game. “If I was coming out of high school, I probably would have chosen to go away,” said the 6— foot—5 swingman, citing offers from several Division I schools that play in the Big Sky Confer- ence. “I just couldn’t see doing that.” Sticking to the Seattle area meant Barokas had the choice of two programs that offered schol- arships. In order to play for the University of Washington, he would have had to walk-on next season. Barokas, instead, liked what he saw in coach Ken Bone and Se— attle Pacific, which cracked the national rankings last season. “They pack their gym,” Barokas said. “They really sup- Charlie Barokas port their program. And they travel a lot.” Next winter SPU will play the Huskies and the University of Dr- egon. Also on tap is a trip to Cali~ fornia to take on Davis. “I didn’t know that until the last day,” said Barokas, “but it helped my deci- sion.” Knowing the odyssey he would travel through the college basket— ball ranks, would Barokas have made the same choice after grad- uating from Mercer Island. “No,” he said. “In fact, if I had it to do it all over again knowing my situation, I would have gone to BCC right away. It allows you to grow up. It gives you the expe- rience.”