Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 20, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 20, 1994
 

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Mercer Island Reporter Better inning by JV baseball show strength at the plate By Toby Therrien Mercer Island Reporter Aaron Clifford has a basic baseball philosophy he’s trying to teach to Mercer Island High School’s junior varsity team as the Islanders head through their schedule this spring. “We try to play one inning at a time,” said Clifford, a 1989 gradu- ate of MIHS who’s in his second year coaching the Islanders’ JV baseball team. “We’re trying to break it doWn into seven parts, to take away from the big picture of winning.” Maybe that’s why so many of the Islanders’ games seem to be hanging on the outcome of a sin- gle inning. Against Lake Washington on April 6th, the Islanders scratched out a run when Jeremy Diltz crossed the plate on Hunter New— ton’s sacrifice fly to tie the game at 3-3 in the sixth inning. The score stood until the bot— tom of the seventh, when hope turned into a disappointing 4—3 loss. The Kangaroos’ leadoff hitter drew a walk from pitcher Jeff Ly— man, moved to second on a base hit. After stealing third base. he Sports briefs scored when a ground ball hopped through the legs of first baseman Ben Page. THEN CAME AN exhilarating 4-2, 10-inning victory over Red- mond on April 11th. Clifford was certainly happy with Mercer Island’s trip to the plate in the fifth inning, when Page pounded a two-out single into center field to score Matt Lawless, tying the game at 2-2. And certainly he had no gripes about their decisive hitting in the 10th inning. James Brack reached first on an error by Redmond’s second baseman to lead off the inning. Then Craig Mills, the Islanders’ third baseman, smacked a double down the left field line. Page walked to load the bases, and after an out, the Mustang pitcher walked Diltz and Nick DiJulio to hand Mercer Island the winning edge. It was the Islanders’ second win of the season — coming after a 7-3 victory over the Newport Knights ~ and marked the contin- ued improvement of their de— fense. “Considering there were only two strike outs in 10 innings,” said Clifford, “that’s a lot of outs in the field.” Junior righthanders Jared Herman and Jeff Lyman com- bined to give up just two Mustang hits through 10 innings. Through five of the last six innings, Her- man and Lyman faced just three batters each inning. Two double plays along the way helped erase leadoff walks. “A lot of our kids are over- achieving,” said Clifford. “We’re believing we’re better than we are. That’s a good trait for a team to have.” UNTIL A PROGRESSIVE hip injury sent him to the sidelines for the season, that included tough lefthanded pitcher and smooth— swinging Kyle Naye. Now the Islanders make do on the mound with Herman, Lyman and sophomore J .J . Muscatel. Mills also filled in nicely against Lake Washington, allowing two hits in four innings of work. Mercer Island’s dependable in- field includes sure-handed DiJulio at short and Brack at second, with Page at first base. Sophomore Tom Monahan also fills in at third. Dave Schwartz has provided solid play in center field, sur- rounded by Lawless, Matt DiNicola, and occasionally Kyle Eng. Clifford said the job of team leader has fallen on the shoulders of junior catcher Jeremy Diltz, who has responded well. “He’s our leader. It’s so impor- tant to have leadership on the field,” said Clifford, including Mills in the mix. “They certainly help me out. I’m really not sure how our team would be doing without those two on the field. They’ve helped these guys focus and have an attitude.” MICC hosts area’s best Jr. tennis pla ers The Mercer Island ountry Club will host some of the area’s best junior tennis players when the Mercer Island Junior Singles Championships takes place this weekend. Play begins this Friday, will continue all day Saturday, with the championships and consola- tion bracket finals in four age groups scheduled for Sunday. The tournament, sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Tennis As- sociation, will feature many of Mercer Island’s best juniors, in cluding Ryan Pang, a senior at Mercer Island High School who is currently ranked third in the re- gion in the 18-&-under age group. Pang will compete against top- seeded Jan Michael Gamble, from Spokane, and second-ranked Jake Raiton, from Portland. Casino Express - flir Service bu *Live Entertainment *Finc Dining *Cocktaiis *Spons Bock (Las Vegas Odds Betting) $500 in GIVEfluIIWS durin , I 800) 258-8800 or 702-738-1826 Reservotlonists on duty 7 dons/week Some estrlctions Rpplu Pores and dates sub GCI to (hon e TEE ALL IN ON E DAY! In spring at Mt. Hood you can ski at Timberline, Mt. Hood Meadows or Mt. Hood SkiBowI, and play golf at the Resort At The Mountain’s scenic 27—hole course all in the same day. At Mt. Hood you’ll also find a selection of restaurants and lodging ranging from resort-level to rustic. Great packages are available, too. So wax the skis and grab your clubs, then head to the Mountain for All Seasons — Mt. Hood, Oregon. MT. HOOD INFORMATION CENTER (503) 622-4822 65000 Hwy. 26 (Adjacent to Mt. Hood Village) Welches. Oregon 97067 Day *500 Slots Trips s *Blackiack BED LION INN no... *Roulette ruuoonmuo mm, in euro, NEVHDH “Poker Room *Round Tnp Airfare Other Island junior expected to compete are Nick Rainey, Milt Reimers, Daniel Corey, Daniel Weissman, Molly McIntosh, Katie Cunha, Nick Graber, Claudia Kalotay, Jack Fleming, Max Rainey, Chad Dierickx and Chris Amundsen. Fencing class starts at Boys 8: Girls Club A fencing class for novice and intermediate students will begin at the Mercer Island Boys 8: Girls Club tonight, from 7 to 9 pm. The eight-week session is open to boys and girls between the ages of 9 Does Your Heart Good. '9 American Heart Association I '" Boeing 75 *Ground Transportation *Fun Pak valued at $13 *Champagne in—flight *Free Cocktails while Gambling Hi ht! "a .' guns all Its _-_ * Shakespeare's Promo y Combos consist of 4'6" I; 2-plece rod and reel , filled with 8 pound line. RSHNG OUTFIT PERFECT“ MATde AN) MIMI) [00 W lift FISHING 0 HUNTING TOYS 0 CAMPING l 'FRIENDLY SERVICE 5 Some lakes open the lolh i and some he 30th; come in I l l ...' - or info. 1 Gel your Fishing Hunting 2: ram- Licenses Here I 392-0228 . l IOOS-SlhAve.N.W. a -.. l lssoquoh ‘One Block Wesl oi Gilmon Village Eehlna' g. Schuclt'x Kentucky Fried Chicken :1 “'4 V and 18. Total cost for the class is $45. Contact Dan McNally at 236—0533 or 232-3246 for more infor- mation. Also, the Mercer Island Junior Fencing Open will be held at the Boys & Girls Club on Saturday, April 30th from 10:30 a.m. to 4 pm. Up to 30 fencers from eight club throughout King County will be competing in the tournament. - 4 Person Family Kits - Backpack Kits 3h'w'mEfi l M PAcT DISASTER RELIEF SUPPLIES EARTHQUAKE KITS Home - Auto - Office All Kits provide for day supply of food, water and medical supplies a with Year Product Shelf Life ———Satisfaction Guaranteed inning Soccer. . . Continued from B1. Just-four minutes later, Andy DeVine made a long run down the right side of the field, angling in and lining a shot under the diving Swenson. Woodlnvllle scored again with 10 minutes left when Aaron Burke unleashed a quick shot from a crowd 10 yards in front of Mercer Island’s net. Despite the scoring deluge, Mercer Island played quite well in the second half. “We learned a lot about our team,” said Ceteznik. “We showed it in the second half when we weren’t just kicking the long , ball. We started passing the ball and we gave them more of a game.” Mercer Island had several chances in the closing minutes. Kingco Conference Boys Soccer Standings M T Pts. Woodlnvllle 14 Newport Bothell Mercer Island Inglemoor Eastlake Lake Wash. Sammamlsh Redmond Interlake Bellevue lssaquah Juanlta o—n—a-n-nwwamoimmmé L 1 0 1 1 3 3 3 4 4 7 9 ooéaaanaodndn The best came from Pochman, who nailed a free kick from 40 yards that almost skipped under Woodinville’s keeper with 12 min- utes left in the game. Two min- utes later he lined a dangerous shot from the left end line, but it came from a bad angle and rolled across the goalmouth out of bounds. “We just have to go from here and put this behind us,” Ceteznik said. “I think these guys will. In some ways it’s disappointing, but maybe it’s good. If you keep on going for a long time, eventually a loss is going to come. 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