Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 22, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 22, 1998
 

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Mercer Island SPORTS Wednesday, April 22, I998 Close game turns to heartbreak Softball team gives up 11 runs in seventh inning to lose 3—2 advantage By Ethan Fowler Mercer Island Reporter escriptions like devastating or heartbreaking wouldn’t even come close to the feel- ings the Mercer Island High School girls fastpitch softball team had af— ter they lost 13—3 to Cedarcrest at Homestead Field on Monday. The Islanders (0—9) played their best game of the season for six in- nings. They made the tough plays. They had the clutch hits. They ap- peared to be on the verge of finally capturing one of their most satisfying wins in recent memory. They had stymied the Red Wolves in all phases of the game, holding ing into ,the last inning. I But the confident feelings that seemed destined for a prolonged cel— ebration after the game never came , for Mercer Island. , CEDARCREST (2-4) destroyed any images of euphoria as soundly as they possibly could in the top of the sev- enth inning, scoring ll runs. The Red Wolves devoured Mercer Island sopho- more pitcher Kelli DeHaan —— who had allowed only three hits in the first six innings in her first start in almost two weeks - for seven hits in the seventh inning while they also capi— talized on three walks and three er- rors. “I think that was my most frus— trating game in my whole entire ca— reer of playing sports,” Mercer Island four—year starter Julienne Oyler said. “It’s different to pull out a game like that or to lose 4-3 be ‘ause the people that are going to wake—up, are going to see the box score and they’re not go- ing to see the heart *— they’re going to see another blowout. “It’s a never—ending cycle of peo- ple trying hard and coming up short,” Oyler said of her years of futility with I the MI fastpitch team, which has gone if 6~54 over her career. “Our coaches said it was a good game and that we fought hard. They said those kind of in- nings just happen, but you kind of dis- credit that because for us, those in— nings happen to us every game and every inning. We’re too far along in the season to use that as an excuse.” EXCUSES SEEMED to be one thing Mercer Island didn’t have to worry about after their inspired play in the bottom of sixth inning. After watch— ing Cedarcrest score two runs in the top of the inning despite DeHaan beginning the inning with two quick outs, the Islanders displayed an unmistakable winning touch in the bottom of the sixth. Senior left fielder Jamie Koehler got the inning started off with a single into right field. Fellow senior, center fielder Brandy Evenson, followed up Koehler’s hit with a triple over Cedarcrest left fielder Casi Lee’s head Not enough fields for drea Local talent will be hurt by lack of Island fields By Ethan Fowler Mercer Island Reporter It is an issue that people are reluc— tant to talk about due to fear of reprisals. It is an issue that has steadily esca— lated over the last decade and likely will continue to do so in the future. Mercer Island, like many towns nationally, is wrestling with the fact that its three baseball-only fields, two at Island Crest Park and one-at South Mercer No.4, are not enough for a community fielding more and more teams battling to improve their skills on the diamond. Whether it’s'the 79 Boys & Girls Club baseball and softball teams, the seven select baseball teams, the three high school baseball teams and two fastpitch softball teams or the multiple adult coed softball teams and three- day tournaments - there aresimply a 3-2 lead go- Girls water polo hands Bainbridge first-ever g state i By Ethan Fowler Mercer Island Reporter Not even a‘ second—place finish at the Bainbridge Invitational could overshadow the momentous first ” victory for the Mercer Island High v School girls water polo team over ‘ eight—time state champion Bainbridge. The 7-5 quarterfinal win is the first the Spartans have ever suf— " d again;th a te am from ‘Washington st A V. “This viiin is-irnportant for us.‘ thi d year‘I‘SIand‘er coach Konrad beiro said. “No one has beaten :3 nbridge‘siin'ce we started this V _' nd to be the first is special. ’ We years ago they beat us 22-0. Lastlyear they beat us in the state :rmar 9-7. Now we have proven to gourselves that they can be stopped. f We just have to do it one more time ~‘-— in the statefinal.” ‘ ' T h: e * ' Islanders (10- 2) fell 12-6 to Chehalem of Newberg, Ore. in the cham- pionship be— hind the three g o a l s o f s o p h o m 0 re A s h l e i g h Jacobs and two tallies by senior Lauren Williams. Mercer Island had held a 2—1 lead and was tied 4— 4 at halftime before giving up a season—high seven goals in the third period to trail ll—5. , Chehalem also handed Mercer Island its only other loss of the season when they beat them 13—8 in late March. 7 “I’m always disappointed by a loss, but our focus is not on Our record,” Ribeiro said. “It is on winning state and working on things we need to do to accom— 9 Humphries Mat Brashears/Mercer Island Reporter With the bases loaded, freshman second baseman Sarah Tobis sees the Islanders’ first chance at victory slipping away in the seventh inning. Cedarcrest, down by a run going into the seventh inning, scored 11 runs in their last at—bat, stealing the win from the Islanders on Monday at Homestead Park. to tie the game at 2-2. Oyler then ripped the first offering from Red Wolves’ hard—throwing reliever Lauren ‘Our coaches said it was a good game and that we fought hard. Pete. tl ‘idl-‘t k ‘k' . - - - 1 t . sass;staggpezslsir.22 They sald those kmd ofmmngs . gamevwinning run, giving the‘Islanders just happen, but you kind of IN THE BAINBRIDGE game, a slim 3—2 lead. the Islander offense caught fire in the final six minutes of play with Jane Humphries and Ashleigh Jacobs leading the way. Jacobs, 0-for—3 from the field at that point, finally found her range and buried a backhand from the center—for— ward position and the rally was on. Humphries, ajunior. found the net twice on pinpoint passes from Lisa Birdsall and Lauren Ayers to stake the Islanders to a 6—3 lead. Bainbridge refused to quit in their home pool and tacked on an— other goal to pull within two with discredit that because for us, those innings happen to us every game and every inning.’ )——- Julienne Oyler AND 45 DEHAAN pitches later —— 14 of which were strikes -~ the game came to a unexpected lopsided end. Sadly for DeHaan, of the IS bat- ters she faced in the seventh inning, six were able to reach base despite counts of 0-2, 1-2 and 3-2. “I think we played a great game the first six innings, but then itjust fell apart,” said DeHaan, who struck out five and walked nine in her first start in two weeks due to a sore arm. “It was frustrating. I can’t even explain it. To have it fall apart all at the end. ...The next time we’ll win the game.” “It does feel awful,” Evenson said. “We have a one-run lead going into the top of the seventh and you think we’re going to pull it off and one er— ror happens and another error hap— In the seventh inning, catcher Julienne Oyler (33), senior, and pitcher Kelli DeHaan, sophomore, talk on the mound. Up through the fifth inning, DeHaan and the Islanders hadn’t allowed a single run. But they broke down, allowing two in the sixth, and 11 in the sev— Please see Water polo on B2 pens—~and there’s just nothing you can enth° I " ‘ , ' ' Wednesday, April 22 .f Please see Softball on B2 Malniamihears/ “Rm u Ffs‘lmcn 30mm“ 3' Menu“ Island Reporter L‘befiy a . a Boys lacrosse at I l [Curtis . Baseballvs; (ls, ,_ ‘ Crest} Girlswate‘r polo at Regen Thursday;Aprfl231 . i 2:45 p;in."Girls-Water polo vs; w . '_ , , GarfieldtMfifSI War/tel} -_._ -. L-V'Girlstennis s. \Newpdrt . Track &'fi€IC‘I£VS; Interlake, Skyline i ‘Fastpitch softball at j, CedarcreSt ‘ ‘ Girls water polo at ,Sammamish Samaria), too many teams and not enough fields. And that’s not even counting the ever~ increasing lacrosse and soccer teams, ' . who are also trying find field time during the spring. “There’s no complete solution to all the teams because three fields are just not enough,” said Ta] Haas, who is the vice president of the year~old Island Baseball Club, which has six select competitive Island baseball teams vying for field use. “If you add sports, you have to take away something and nobody wants anything taken away,” said Scott Florsheim, Mercer Island High School assistant athletic director. And Florsheim’s point is the crux of the dilemma. As new teams, new sports and the numbers of participants have steadily increased, the fields on Mercer Island have remained the same. Since 1991, almost every sport on the Island has either doubled or tripled while the number of baseball-only fields has remained the same. Although, there has yet to bc a fight over field use, heated arguments are also apparent- ly on the rise. “People are really protective of the time they get,” said Emery Billings, Mercer Island Parks & Recreation “o a, “was... a, .,....: . , ,9, .. . . ~_-.Biasehall,at Newport ‘ , ; 1 F3 ' treaseabaiivg. 'Matt Brashears/Mercer Island Reporter Jacob Tobis, left, Isaac Tobis, center, and Danny Schwartz have a home run derby at Homestead Park’s north ball field on Thursday afternoon. If it weren’t for spring break, the boys would have found both the north and south fields occupied by Mercer Island High School softball teams. ‘ ’ . Please see Fields on B2