Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 22, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 22, 1998
 

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34 .m- ind aw we. "Mimi. «Wm .w a..,._. 4...”... its; LIFESTYLE Wednesday. April 22, 1998 up a Sit/eat for a cause here’ll be lots of panting Tand sweating at Hec Edmundson Pavilion at the U Dub this Sunday, for the Workout for Hope, when repre- sentatives from athletic clubs all over the area will act as instruc- tors to some 500 people in a gi— ant aerobics class. It’s all a fund raiser in the fight to find a cure for HIV/AIDS. hosted a two-hour aerobics and con— ditioning class to r 18 is. MORGAN for the City of AROUND THEISLAND Hope, a leading organization in the fight to find a cure for HIV/Aids. This is the fourth consecutive year the club has hosted such an event, which featured co—owners Bryan Welch and Ginny Johnson and raised nearly $1,500. Club' Emerald's fund raising efforts earned it a “number one ranking for all Puget Sound Athletic Club’s Master Classes, and in all probability a top ten ranking na— tionally," said City of Hope’s 1998 Workout Chairman Pete Williams. This is the fourth straight year Club Emerald has attained the local leadership title. “We are continually im- ‘ pressed and constantly amazed by the generosity of our mem— bers, and by Mercer Island resi— dents in general,” Johnson said after the event. For more information on the Workout For Hope, contact Club ‘ Emerald at 232-7080, or the City of Hope at (425) 6469530. ' The work of some talented ‘iMercer Island artists will be fea— tured at “Northwest by . Nerthwest," the new artexh'ibit opening at the East Shore Gallery on April 27 and running through June 1. Genny Reese, Joe Schoeneker and Barbara Shuman will show their water- colors, and Suzanne Carson’s pastels will be on display. In ad- dition, Byron Ives, will be showing his woodcarvings of birds. Other artists include Beth Betker and Hubertus Liere, oil paintings; Sheila Ralston, col— ored pencil drawings, and Bill Kent, Watercolors. East Shore Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 pm. The Mercer Island Women’s ' ‘Club has new officers for next year: Floria Connealy, presi— dent; Audrey Bolson and Sue Kieburtz, first vice presidents; Rebecca Klein and Melanie Doren, second vice presidents; Margot Atchison, secretary; Geri Dykeman, treasurer; and Ramona Warrick, parliamentar— 1an. The new officers will be in stalled at the club’s annual Civic Awards luncheon at the Broadmoor Golf Club on Monday, May 11. This year, the ‘ Civic Awards will go to: Mercer Island Fire Department, Mercer Island Youth and Family Services, Mercer Island'Senior Adult/Services, and Eastside Domestic Violence. The reservation deadline for the luncheon is May 6; cost is $24. For questions and informa— tion, call Cathie at 232—2116. For an evening of fun, mark Saturday, May 16 On your calen— ‘ dar. That’s the night of “Caribbean Carnival” at the Mercer Island Boys & Girls Club, a casual evening of dinner, casino games, cocktails, music and fun. It’s a fund raiser for the club, organized by Frank‘Sorba and Nan Mitzel and the Boys & Girls Club board of directors. . And to ensure that everyone has a rockin’ good time, the live mu- sic is by Junior Cadillac. ‘ There’ll be a few auction items to buy, games to play, dinner by Cueina Prestoto enjoy, and great . oldies tunes to get you dancing. Tickets are $50 per person; for reservationseall the club at 232—4548. By'Linda Morgan 13 days. ‘5 On Friday night those five former athletes -— Carl Lovsted, Fil Leanderson, Alvin Ulbrickson, Richard Wahlstrom } and Albert Rossi will be honored by the University of Washington, when they are inducted into the 1998 Husky Hall of Fame. LOVSTED, an Island resident since ;‘ 1956, is an understated sort who likes to slander mak By DeAnn ROSSe’tt‘i Mercer Island Reporter the octaves. UW crew team that went to 1952 Olympics to be inducted into the Husky Hall of Fame Mercer Island Reporter t hey’ll probably always wonder if they could have won the silver. But the course that day in the . Meilahti Gulf was rain-swept and windy. The Czechs, who took the gold, had been training together for years. So had the Swiss team, which placed sec— ond in the Four Oars With Coxswain crew race in the 1952 Helsinki Olympic Games. I? The UniversityyofWashingtonrow~_ , ..__ ers won the broriZe - clocking in at 7:37 to Switzerland’s 7:36.5'in the 2,000 meter course. It was a heady triumph for the five UW undergraduates who had been towing on the same boat for just A long, rectangular wooden in— strument restson the table. It looks like an enormous violin crossed with an accordion. It’s called a nyckelhatpa, and it’s a Swedish stringed instrument played with a small bow that has keys along the tops of the strings to change It’s actually related to. the English hurdygurdy andthe violin, and the name comes from the Swedish word for key, “nykel” and “harps” meaning fiddle. Hence, in Sweden it’s of— ten ..referred to as the “SWedish Key Fiddle”. . Trella Hastings, at Mercer ' was what . Island resident,» has been " several years. . “I’d played Swedish and Scandinavian music on the, violin for years for groups ‘ like the Skandia Felkdance I spent six months in Denmark working asr-a lab technician on a re: search project, and I became more in- terested in Scandinavian‘culture. I there was a lot of Scandinavian cttlt’ure here, so I moved herein 196 .” Soon after, she met her entrant sig- nificant other, Dave, and heard the‘ Wmn’.» 1" a . . .‘. A .. ,thing?’ playing the nyekelharpa for underplay his role on that charmed shell. Rossi re— members Lovsted as a “strong and steady" oarsman. “He just did his work,” says Rossi. “He was one of those inspirational, dedicated guys who didn’t have to say anything.” , The boat’s success was a team effort, Lovstedem— phasizes, not an individual accomplishment. “I was very fortunate,” he says with characteristic modesty. Still, he loves reminiscing. And he loves the sport , he passionately pursuedall through cola lege -——’ so much so that, at age 68, he’s still involved with it. He serves on the UW Board of Rowing Stewards, he’s tight with crew coach Bob Ernst, he keeps track of the UW program and even knows the varsity eight’s winning time in the recent San Diego Crew Classic (5:38.66). “Athletics has been a big part of my life, and I’ve met wonderful people.” says Lovsted. He learned valuable lessons through rowing, he says, lessons like discipline and teamwork. “I’ve ap- plied those things in many areas of my life.” HUSKY HALL OF FAME CELEBRATION When: 6 pm. on Friday, April 24 of Covanough's inn on Filth Ave. in Seattle. How much: Tickets are $60 for Universin of Washington Alumni Association members, $65 for non—members. For reservations, call the UW Alumni Association of 543- 0540. Please see Crew on C5 nyckelharpa being played during the Skandia dances. ‘ When he; went on a trip to Sweden, she asked him to find and purchase one for her.” “I wasqamazed that he did find one and brought it back, but it took a year or two before I could find anyone to teach them play. My first thought , when Dave brought it back was “what u do I do with this thing?” {Then she met_Ba-rt 6My Brashers, a local serentist tthought "getting his Ph.D. in at~ mosphen'c science, and the Pacific Northwest guru of nyckelharpa, and found out what-she had been miss— ing by not playing this unique instrument. “He’s been instrumen— tal in getting so many peo- ple to play the nyckelharpa. He’s a great musician him-. self, and he decided to have ' a gathering of people in- terested in playing. I went, I c and that got me started play- it.” . ’ Karin Lowe-Osbom, who grew up on Mercer Island and Anna Abraham, whose grandmother lives on the Island, also play nyckelharpa,and Karin has taken lessons with Trella from a woman on Bainbridge Island, but that in— do‘I‘do with this L-— Trella Hastings Trella Hastings plays a song entitled “Lokomobilen strument, in her midvlsland home recently. The nyckelharpa is played with a small bow that has keys along the tops of the strings to change the Octaves. Please see Nyckelharpa on C5 ,........_.r.......-_ w.“ WWW“w.......,.‘...w.ew~w..waw»..- .......,_..._..........w.._. a... N. madman.........wwe..._....w~«a..c.r.w,.....na~...wr Amwmamwn.” dawnsmcmwnmta.manta.“iv».»..r.~...c.w “an”... .c....,.e.....w......, We- a... muSic With ‘ a rare SWEdiSh String€d instrument Fortyrsix years ago, Island resident Carl Lovsted rowed to a bronze medal as part of the United States" 1952 Olympic crew team in Helsinki, Finland. This Friday, he and his four teammates will be inducted into the 1998 Husky Hall of Fame. The pho— tos below show the team at the ’52 Olympics. In the lower photo, the Crew team USA is, left to right, Fil Leanderson, Richard Wahlstrom, Al Ulbrickson, Carl Lovsted, and front, AI Rossi. ‘ Matt Brashears/ Mercer Island Reporter mmmmmmmswrm. a W_.WWW Matt Brashcars/Mercer Island Reporter ” (steam engine) on a nyckelharpa, a Swedish stringed in’ .-., I.-.