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Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 22, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 22, 1998
 

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I998 ' ; per- . I in- erse- not ng of tresi- Jorth 'hrist mber rrg y Wednesday, April 22, 1993 Schaps scholarships available Applications are currently being ac- cepted for the Nancy Schaps Memorial Scholarship which recognizes a child who has lost a parent through death, or who is currently experiencing the terminal illness of a"parent. An award of $500 will be given to an elementary, middle school or high school student to be used for some- thing which will make a significant positive difference in adjustment to this life change. As an example, the scholarship may be used for lessons, a camp experience, sports equipment, a trip, or a musical instrument. Applications and information are available by calling Cheryl Frizzel at 236-0894. Applications are also avail- able through school counselors and they are due by May l. Public contributions to the schol- arship fund will be accepted. Applications or contributions should be sent to the PTA Council. Mercer Reporter Charitable Fund accepting grant applications The Mercer Island Reporter Charitable Fund is currently accepting applications for grants to organiza- tions benefiting the residents of Mercer Island. The deadline for the next round of grant applications is May 12. Grants may be for any worthwhile purpose, including social services, ed— ucation, health care projects and oth- er similargpurposes. _ Grants may be for specific projects or events or for operating support for local organizations. Requests shOuld be for a minimum of $250 and a max- imum of $2,500. The requesting organization must be recognized under the Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)3 as a publicly supported not-for-profit 0r- ganization. Island Administration building, 4160 86th Ave. 8.13., Mercer Island 98040. SHOWCASEHOME Gorgeous Contemporary, Waterfront Setting " A remarkable property and one of. the largest homes on the Island, with six bedrooms and five and one half baths. Deep water dOCk has moorage fer several boats. H u ,, r in r; With a U. Market, you can figetto your money ' Whenever you need it. ,rene East Channel ,1 s g , Bring The Outdoors In For more information call Pat Wallace Sue Gebhardt 947-2209 232-9509 “Representing Elegant Locations" REAL ESTATE if Bank In? exed [1 Today. Right this minute. , 1 Ti f: Yesterday. ' g (Choose one) ll ' I I S i m i it $5,000 min. balance :{r and at 3,000. UBank® ATMs. You can link it with in other U.S. Bank accounts, to transfer funds to and from tzl or a; < . "2&7?" tr 3; can access your funds by check, phone, Indexed Money Market account, you around, indexed to the 13-‘Week Treasury Bill diSCOunt ‘ rate, so it’s always competitive. Our minimum balance US Bank Indexed Money Market ' 1 Yes Avg. Money Market requirement is also lower Wed No.‘ No No ATM access than similar accounts. ..Tr'ansfer funds to/tronr checking Yes. Yes Plus, your account is FDIC 24—hour access insured. To open your your checkinglaccount or make payments on a loan. And ’Indexed Money Market, stop by Or call 1-‘800-890-BANK. ,3 ©1998 U.S. Bank. Member FDIC. The minimum collected balance to earn the Annual Percentage Yield (APY) Is $5.000. Our rates are even higher tor larger As 0! 3/1/98. U.S. Bank's Indexed Money Market APY's no “,2 corresponding minimum collected balartcdsara: $0 -$4.999 1.25%. $5.000 $24,999 4.25%. $25,000 - $99,999 4.35%. 3100,0004» 4.45%. Fees may reduce earnings on the account. The rate may change utter the account Is opened. The objective of the Mercer Island Reporter Charitable Fund is to im- prove the lives of the residents of Mercer Island with grants for worth— while purposes. The fund was established in 1995 by the trustees of the H.R.H. Family Foundation, which provides fund- ing for all grants. A committee will evaluate the -— Continued from page CI structor moved to Norway to teach piano at a music school. Still, Trella and nyckelharpists from this area, Vancouver, California and all points in between allrget together for training and “jam-sessions” when- ever possible. The latest workshop was held at Hasting'shome on Mercer Island on April 4, with Bart Brashers making his final round as instructor before he moves to North Carolina to be with his fiance. Meanwhile, he has established the American Nyckelharpa Association (ANA) here in Seattle and created a web site to allow fellow nyckelharpa players and enthusiasts the chance to find out about Scandinavian events, world-wide societies supporting the nyckelharpa and advising members on dates and times of workshops as well as news from Sweden, where the nyckelharpa has undergone a Renaissance after nearly dying out in the 19505 and ‘605. The modern “chromatic” nyckel— harpa that Hastings plays is an in- strument that has evolved in the past 600 years to have 16 strings; three melody strings, one drone string and 12 sympathetic vibration strings. It has 37 wooden keys that slide under the strings with a tangent that stops, or “frets,” a string to make a particular note. The player pushes on the keys with ' the left hand, and uses a short bow on the lower strings with the right. There Crew. . . Continued from page Cl LOVSTED’S LIFE took a mem— orable turn when UW coach Al Ulbrickson reshuffled his eight—cared crew just after the Inter Collegiate Rowing Association Regatta in Syracuse. NY. to create an eight and a four boat. Both would compete in the U.S. Olympic rowing trials in i . Worcester, Mass, less than two weeks away. , ' Ulbrickson‘s four-with~cox com- ‘ bo, it tumed out, was hot: \Mth Lovsted rowing bow, Leanderson, strOke, Wahlstrom,'No. 3, Ulbrickson (the coach’s son), No. :2 and Rossi, cox, the Huskies'oui‘tdistanced the Washington Athletic Club and Navy crews to grab one of seven berths on the U.S. rowing team. The rowers were-eUphoric ——— and so Was theSeattle press. “UW Four- Oared MakesOlympics,” screamed the headlines, as sports\writers, not yet distracted by Seattle’spre teams. scrambled for news about the star E oarsmen. News from Helsinki was 'equally spirited, with photos and de- tails about the U.S. four filling sports pages. “It was quite a feeling, being around the super athletes,” Lovsted remem- bers. “Could we have done better? You never know the answer to that. We did the best we could under the con- MOUNTAIN ADVENTURETRAVEL NW Alpine Photography Seminars. Special Spring Discounts: Safari 81 Zanzibar extensions , 206.93 7-8389 "9.79.940. Most people are con MADNESSo Trekking 81 Climbs in Africa, Asia,- S. America, Ladakh, "fiber 81 Peru. Sikkim, 5/11 ............. .. $2835 Kilimanjaro, 6/ 16' ..... .. $2800 Mercer Island Reporter C5 applications and may grant up to $5,000 per year. Information and grant applications are available at the Mercer Island Reporter office, 7845 SE. 30th Street. Applications are evaluated three times per year. For more information, or for a grant application, contact the Reporter at (206) 232-1215, or stop by the office. N yckelharpa. . . are four types of nyckelharpa being played; most have a three-octave range, and sound something like a very res~ onant violin. . Currently there are 725,000 nyck- elharpa players in the world, with 100 in America.- and about 10 in Canada. “You can either stand to play or sit in a chair," said Hastings. “Either way it’s a fun instrument to play." Hastings volunteers at the Nordic Heri'tage Museum’s music library. which contains the work of Gordon Tracy, a man who traveled all over the world researching Scandinavian music. making recordings of nyckel- ‘ harpa and other Swedish music that were never recorded anywhere else. She also co-produced a CD of the Pioneer Trio, 21 Scandinavian music group, with the help of her son Phil, who plays violin with the Pacific Northwest Ballet orchestra. “Scandinavian music is very dance~ able," she said. “We’ve got a group called “All Keyed Up” who have played at Julefest at the Nordic Heritage Museum, at 'the Skandia “Midsommarfest” in- Poulsbo and short sets for the Skandia Folkdance Society." Though she's not Swedish, Hastings is a booster for all things Scandinavian, and thinks the nyckelharpa will catch on with more exposure here in America. .“It gives wonderful depth to the music." she said. “When you hear a group of nyckelharpa together the sound is incredible.” ditions.” After 46 years, there’s still a twinge in cox Al Rossi’s voice as he —- once again replays the race. “We’d .won every race in the trials and each of two races in the Olympics except the last one,” he says. “We were second throughout the whole race...we lost the silver by one stroke. But at least we medaled. We were happy all the way.” . And lucky to compete in the Olympic Games, says UW coach Ernst. “The face of the Olympics has changed since 1952," says Emst. “It’s much bigger now. Most Olympic teams are national teams with the best people from all over the country that train all year around." ' THESE DAYS Lovsted, an in- ‘ surance broker, still stays “reason— ably fit,” he says. “I played basket- ball up to age 64, and still shoot hoops. I don't feel that old.” Athletics, he says, have changed. Programs are becoming too demand- ' ing. “They are putting too much pres- sure on kids today — somewhere, you have to draw aTIine." And his own sport has evolved. In his day, training meant rowers rowed. “There were no ergs, no seat racing, we didn’t lift weights and we didn’t‘mn. Now, there are nutritionists, special trainers, different blades and expen- sive shells. They have it down to a science." He and his wife, Louise, keep in touch with his rowing buddies. As Al Rossi says, “It’s the only sport I know of where people cling together fOr- ever." ‘ And that bronze medal? It’s at home ~- in a cabinet. “I was very for- tunate that things fell my way,” Lovsted says simply. , a fused about Which diet or exercise program to use. Call Mark Ginther fora nutritiOnal and exercise program designed for your specific needs. 1 :z, ' i To my bench press!” Joel Robinsdn, Shoreline WA RENAISSANCE FITNESS Periodized Strength Programs 0 Mens & Women's Fitness Nutritional Guidance 9 Kickboxerclse (425) 488-5938 . g \, “I’ve lost 10-inches of?“ my waist and added 60 lbs. 1 . 1“