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Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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April 29, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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April 29, 1998
 

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C2 Mercer Island Reporter . . —- Continued from page C1 individuals and corporations to sup- port the project which they hope to premiere when the Mariners’ new sta~ dium opens next spring. With interest from Seattle's PBS affiliate KCTS and an agreement with a major video distribution company to represent the film, Crow is confident that the funding can be raised, Hesees an interesting parallel between his two passions. “Baseball and film—making are both collaborate arts." he says. “You can’t do either on your own." Wanted: stories about the Rainiers Thousands of baseball fans‘ pack the bleachers of their new outdoor stadium on opening day, cheering a team of sports he- roes. Is this Seattle 1999’? No. it’s the year 1938 and the Seattle Rainiers begin a baseball legacy that endured for decades. Do you have special memo‘ ries of the Seattle Rainiers‘.’ Filmmaker Dan Crow would like to talk to anyone who played, cheered or worked for this team. He is anxious to talk to fans, hot~ dog vendors. ticket takers and kids who peeked through the fence to get a glimpse of the ac- tion. “We are looking for peo- ple who have interesting stories to tell about their experiences with the Rainiers," Crow says. Although the film depends on interviews, archival footage and early recordings of games, Crow believes it is people‘s mem- ories and stories which will cap- ture the Rainiers’ magic. Crow would like to chronicle the tales of those who remember the Rainiers. many of whom are now in their 70s and 80s. Crow is also seeking old pho- tographs. home movies and any memorabilia from the team that people would be willing to share. He may be contacted at (206) 292-8564. on ‘Jewish Rites’ Professor Ivan Marcus of Yale University will deliver three Stroum Lectures at the University of Washington in April and May enti— tled, “Jewish Rites: A History of the Life Cycle.” The first lecture, “Birth. School, Bar Mitzvah," will be held at 8 p.m., Monday, April 27 in the HUB Auditorium. The second, “Courtship, Marriage, Parenting,” will be held at 8 p.m., Wednesday, April 29 in 220 Kane Hall. The third. “Aging, Dying, Remembering,” is at 8 p.m., Monday, May 4 in 220 Kane. Marcus traces ancient Jewish and Grew-Roman elements in rites'and analyzes them from a variety of per- spectives For information, call (206)543-4243. patio windows brighten 0 Speaker t O S hlpS . . . - Continued from page Cl people who volunteer their time, plus pay room and board, to sail to third world countries to perform surgery, give medicine to the sick and provide information on everything from breast feeding to dental care and safe hand washing practices to help prevent dis- ease. Why ships? Of the world’s 24 largest cities. 21 are port cities, and two-thirds of the world’s population live within 100 miles of a port city. Ships are the cheapest way to get the medical and agricultural professionals to the needy in countries such as Nicaragua, South Africa, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea and Lithuania. The ships have visited more than 60 ports, and also provide agricultural assistance and construc- tion of hospitals, schools, homes. church- es and fresh-water wells. The Relief and Development de— partments of the Mercy Ships leave a legacy of hope that those towns they build in will be better places to live when they leave. More than 15 mil~ lion pounds of medical supplies, equip— ment, foéd, seeds, clothing, building materials, wheelchairs, literature, blan~ kets, vehicles and even a fire engine have been distributed to towns in third world countries. lnterdenominational and Christian- based. Mercy Ships were founded by Donald Stephens in 1978. The first ship to hit the waves was the Anastasis, a 522-foot‘ vessel, followed by the Caribbean Mercy at 265 feet and the Island Mercy at, 173 feet. Since then; they‘ve added the Caribbean Mercy and the Island Mercy to the American fleet. They hope to add a ship that will sail for Asia within the next two years. THE REV. DALE SEWALL of Mercer Island Presbyterian Church has been lured by the Mercy Ships’ siren call to help others as well, and asked the advance team to settle in at the MIPC offices. “Our long—term commitment is that Mercy Ships will provide an opportu- nity for some ofour congregants to go on board and volunteer,” he said. “I don’t see Mercy Ships as an American effort; it’s an international organiza— tion. The Anastasis has 43 languages spo— ken aboard, so it’s like a huge global vil— lage.” Sewall and his congregants are at the forefront of Mercy Ships’ future Islanders will be honored by The Performing Arts Festival/Eastside will hold their annual recognition and awards con- certs at 7:30 p.m., on Friday and Saturday, May I and May 2, with a matinee at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 2, at the Bellevue Christian Church Center, 10808 SE. 28th Street in Bellevue. Each conceit program will feature different Overall Excellence win- ners from the festival’s adjudicated contest, which was held the week of April 13. The concerts will be followed by a public reception to honor the winners and are free to the public. The program is spon— sored by the Bellevue and King . County Arts Commissions. Mercer Island students receiv- ing Overall Excellence awards in Performance include: Ben Su, vi— olin solo, Class 4, Chris Greenman, Violin Solo, Class 5, Stephanie Enzmann, Flute Solo, Class 2, Marcus Macauley, Original Composition, Class 2 and Kingley Tan, Original Composition, Class Matthew Henderson, son of Deborah Poland of Mercer Island, at~ tained citizenship recognition for the third trimester from the Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro. NH. Citizenship denotes those who inde- pendently demonstrate personal re— sponsibility. Mercer Island High School gradu— ate Erin Morton is graduating from Colorado College this spring. She will graduate with a biology degree and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Edward C. Lin, a Washington State University freshman, was inducted into the Phi Eta Sigma national fresh— man honor society for eaming at least a 3.5 GPA. Lin, son of Paul and Lingfen Lin of Mercer Island, is a 1997 grad- uate of Mercer Island High School and is studying computer science. Performing Arts Festival 3. Nicole Cusack received an Overall Excellence in Ballet for Advanced ballet students. Honorable Mentions given to Mercer Island students were: Michelle Choc, Piano, Class'2, Marcus Macauley, Piano, Class 4 and Piano Concerto, Class 9; Tony Pal, Violin, Class 4, Chris Greenman, Violin, Class 5, Ben Su and Rebecca Maret, Violin Concert Class 12; Alexis Panteleakos, Cello, Class 2. Julia Reece, Flute, Class 3 and Jenny Buckley, Flute, Class 4. Stephanie Enzmann received an Honorable Mention for Flute Concerto Class 6. Original composition Honorable Mentions were given to: Jan and Annelise Hemstadxin Class 1, and Michele Conrad in Class 2. The annual Spring Festival is in its 12th year of holding student au- ditions and presenting the recogni- ‘ tion and awards concert programs. Nearly $5000 in awards, music study grants and scholarships will be hand— ed out at the concert programs. Cadet Jesse Parsons, son of Dr. and Mrs. Kevin Parsons of Mercer Island, was recently honored at Missouri Military Academy. Parsons, an eighth- v grader at the academy, received the ParadeBar with two stars for having successfully participated in the 29th annual St. Louis St. Patrick’s Day pa— Parsons also received the Barracks, Maroon Triange in Posture, Good Readers Society, the Military honor medal bar, and a certificate in wrestling. Whitman College freshman Sean Collins, 5 1997 graduate of Mercer Island High School, sang bass with the Whitman College Chorale in its spring concert. Marc Macauley, a seventh-grader at Islander Middle School, placed first in Music, Junior Division, at the Washington State Reflections Contest. Nil/1' ll‘i'll'lllll/l/l/ lll'il‘ rill/lll‘ss/lllls Skilled nursing Reassuring comfort in a .ho'melike setting At the new Health Center at Covenant Shores, spacious resident, rooms open attractive dining and day areas. Stylights and expansive a cozy residential 111 YEARS OF CARING care... interior. And our skilled staff provides the _ nursing care you’d expect from a leading retirement community—supportive care that fosters wellness and independence. 0 Short—term rehabilitation ' g 0 Post-hospital recuperation , 0 Long-term care Call today for more information or to schedule a visit to our state-licensed skilled nursing residence, (206) 2300600 or (800) 362-1456. CENTER a COVENANT SHORES 2' "Continuation f A CONTINUINcflARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 9150 N. Mercer Way 0 Mercer Island, WA 98040 0’206-268-3000 (800) 362-1456 ~fl (Mariano wirean (immunity ’ . Callahan; Shores is. administered by German: Retirement Communities, Inc on behave/tile Board of Benevolence of the Evangah'aal Covenant Church ‘ Visit our Webvsit at 1ittp;//www.covenantretlrementcom challenges. “Our church has a real in— terest in Asia, as we feel that Seattle is a gateway to Asia, so we are helping to raise funds to build a Mercy Ship specifically for Asia.” Chuck Cooper, a member of the Advance Team for Mercy Ships, notes that the phenomena of “owning” pro— jects with Mercy Ships isn’t uncom- ‘ mon. , “People who go out on the ships 'and see what a difference they make in the lives of the poor come back ru- ined for ordinary work,” he said. “We’ve seen some real changes in communities where we have taught agricultural skills; suddenly the whole community knows how to use the land to support thei people." The ships and their crews general- ly spend only five months out of the year in third world'countries; the rest of the time is spent fund raising in the “first world” countries, like the United States and the United Kingdom. “We’re try— ing to work ourselves out. of a job,” said Cooper. “We want the people from these third world countries to take re— sponsibility and make a lifestyle change." The Caribbean Mercy will be docked in Seattle on April 28 and open for tours April 30 through May 11. CHARLEY MURPHEY Senior Loan Consultant Wednesday, April 29, 1998 The Duby family poses in front of the Anastasis in 1993. From left to right are Sue with Peter, Krista and Chuck. The family traveled aboard 7 the Mercy Ships in 1988. 188 106m Ave NE #210 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 590-4415 Reduced Closing Cost Options .1 ‘F-lekible ApprovalCriteria'? within“ whim m t-lt mummy... apply. in. Lookin For Church? ‘l\'v Ill‘. ili‘ ion Ill 1 \pt-l it'lltclnnl 'l llrllllgll Caring Community Joyful Worship Prayer Faith Development Transforming Bible Study Sunday "I 1111 AU! “.l '1'} AM WUV lHlWrmn ltgl l1.lll‘l‘l”l'/lllt‘lll llllm: lllllll (Elwin, l‘fiump lllvilll MERCER I COVENANT CHURCH 3200 78m Ave SE Across from the Post Office CALL: 2324015 6195 ‘ 92nd S.E.. Mercer Island 232—7243 1 A Reform Congregation Religious School Classes Pre-SchooI-ngh School Sun.. Tues, Wed. Thurs. James Louis Mirel. Rabbi , Davld Serkln-Poole, Cantor Worshlp Fri. 6:00 pm; Sat. 10:30 am St. Monica’s Catholic Church 4315 asm S.E., M.l. ......... ..~ .... ..232-2900 Sunday VlgII: Saturday, 5:00 pm Sunday: 8:00 am, 9:30 am, and 11:00 am Rev. John Bowman CHRISTIAN SCIENCE l First Church of Christ, 3 Scientist 3 Island Crest We at SE 47th 10 am Service Sunda School , 8 pm Wednesday Child Care l Budan Room ’ 3 Mom-Fri. 10 am-5 pm N Sat 10 elm-1:30 m 7829 SE 27111 532-5850 . A liberal religious community welcoming everyone Sunday Service and Church School 9:00 am. and 11:00 a.m. ; i 127008.13, 32nd St.. Bellevue 425-741-3780 (off Richards Road. north of Factoria and 1-90) The Rev. Dr. Peter .I. Luton. Senior Minister temple Btnal Corah EAST SHORE UNITARIAN CHURCH Mercer): f ._ " Island . .1 , T “I Presbyterian Church ’ Christian Education for all ages WK.“ Island, Crest Way 9:30-10:15 Top of the hill (206) 232-5595 Chlldmre available "*8: 15 Ih‘t‘uklflSl Service in I‘t'll()\\.\IlI|) Hull Illtlli‘t lll‘ellkllisl til 7:45 ‘10:)“ \mrsllip in tin Sillit’tllrul‘) i Congregational Church of (United Church of Christ) Michael T. Bush Redeemer Lutheran Church 6001 Island Crest Way ......... ..'...232-t711 1 Worship: 10:30 am Bible Study: 9:15 am HOLY TRINITY . LUTHERAN CHURCH l 8501 SE 40th Nursery Carr, Wlleclclmlr Access Mercer Island 4545 Island Crest Way 232-7800 Worship Service Sunday School ‘ 10:30 am. Sunday BBC Classes 9 10 am. Pastor Bill Clements 232-3270 1 Worship Schedule I 8:00 am. Worship . Eucharist in‘ , the Chapel , 10:15 am. Worship Service 1 9-10 am. Sunday School 1 all ages PaulA.Fauske,I’astor/. . Woody Carlson, Pastor, r SATELLITE SALES & SERVICE. lllllillllllll - Mum-Room Installs ' Euro-Asia TV I Seattle...........206-624-7I17 Snohomlsh 360-5684 340 Everett. ........ ..425-353-3800 Bell/Red....'...425-882-0164 Auburn ........ ..253-833-5l 'I I Woodinvllle....425-483-8500 I -800-WHY-HOME *CaII for detolls. sver ‘ Pl t: ’ Piihlfllltll 81‘ mil SYSTEM INSTALLED g =$99 Installed I8” System crwonx YSTEM 3 “if 50 Y DIRECT-V. FREE INSTALL KIT OR $100 0l=l=7 Professional Installation SYSTEM 4 7tl.lolon. .FuIl glow DIGITAL Antennas 8: UHF ON SALE! We Service 8. Sell All Systems MLK We the C a' rim the ‘rel Bo lht