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Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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June 10, 1998     Mercer Island Reporter
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June 10, 1998
 

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I t l l l l tiara LIFESTYLE YT N veterans are » n honor of the Youth INorthwest’s 15th anniversary YTN is holding a reunion at ' 7:30 pm. Saturday, June 20 at the YTN alumni should come with photos of when worked at theater —- and with stories about how their the— ater experience helped provide self—confidence in performing arts or other careers. “If you can find it, wear one of your old YTN T—shirts,” . requests alumni commit— , _‘ tee mem: ber Patty Baskin. “Does anyone still have the very first one —- black, with a gold star on the Linda MORGAN from?” AROUND THE ISLAND Got cars? Do you have a classic auto sit- ting in your garage? Consider en- tering it in the 2nd Annual Classic Car Show at Mercer Island’s Summer Celebration. The show will be held in the south end of Rite Aid (for- merly PayLess) parking lot from 10 a.m..to 5 pm. Sunday, July 12. Cars must be over 25 years . old, according to Classic Car Show coordinator Rich Fuhrman. There will be special prizes and a People’s Choice Award. Call Fuhrman at 275—0509 if you have a car to enter; space is limited, and reservations will be taken on a first come, first served basis. I Also, call if you’d like to vol— unteer as a docent for the show. Summer Celebration will be held the weekend of July 10-12. Ryther group raises .money at luncheon The Mercer Island unit of Ryit'her Child Center Leagues: held a luncheon and fashion ‘ . show May 22 at the home of , Sheron and Roger O’Connell. Fashions for the event were pro— g vided by Boutique Christiane-of ' Bellevue, with members and .. friends modeling. Proceeds bene- fited the Ryther Child Care Center. Island members of the organi- zation include O’Connell, Ina ' Bahner, Jeanne Cree, Pam .Taylor, Merle Farmer, Missy Cary, Irene Mulroy and Linda Banchero. Heading to Israel Nine Islanders will be heading to Israel this month to attend the Alexander Muss High School in Israel. Sarah Shulman, Nathan Bumstein, Miriam D’Jaen, Daniel Glowitz, Jeffrey Miller, Mari Rosen, Louise Shaloum, Celene Temkin and Diana Brooks will use the historic country as their classroom as they study during the two—month academic program. For more in- formation about the Alexander Muss program, call Kay Rabinowitz at 441-8479., ext. 224. Islanders Sing in Vocalpoint! Seattle ‘ For a real summertime treat, checkout “All Summer Long,” Vocalpoint! Seattle’s musical re— view of favorite summertime hits from the ‘50s and ‘60s. The group ends its 14th sea- son with a two-week run of the show beginning Thursday, June 18 at the Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway on the cam- " pus of South Seattle Central ' Community College. Performances are at 8 pm. Thursday through Saturdays, and at 2:30 pin. on Sundays. Three Islanders Ben Schor, Scott Palmason and Talia Klein, , are members of the group, which is an affiliate ensemble of the Northwest Boychoir and part of The Northwest Choirs organiza— tion, Vocalpoint! Seattle serves as an advanced educational and per- formance program for young men ‘ and women with vocal, dance and theater skills. Whetherthe barbecue is old- fashioned or new, food cooked on a grill always tastes better on outdoor cooking “Barbecue and Smoke Cookery,” she relates this fascinating tidbit: the charcoal briquette came to us from father of the automobile in America, Henry Ford. “In 1924, Mr. Ford built a plant near the hardwood forests in \Vlsconsin to make wood parts for his Model T,” she writes. “The wooden scrap piled up, so he had‘to build another plant to burn it, thus creating a charcoal plant.” The plant became so productive, Henry went public, bagging his bri- quettes and promoting his new method of outdoor cooking. Then Kingsford Company acquired. the plant and bar- becuing began its rise to popularity. In Maggie Waldron’s classic book . in the last 20 years-gas grills «have become popular because they are so easy to use. , ', Everything always tastes better when it’s cooked over a fire — our oldest cooking method and our simplest. GRILLING DOESN’T HAVE to be.a “guy” thing, but at‘ our house I when the sun shines, I just hand over the platter of prepared foods to be grilled to'my husband with’a cheer- ful “here you go, honey” and he heads outside to do battle with the barbe- cue. Now, this is a man who doesn’t boil eggs on the stove, but takes great pride in perfect grilling! Armed with long- tined fork and protected by an apron and a cooking mitt, he’s off'—— to re— turn only when he’s victorious and presents a perfectly cooked platter of wonderfully-smelling food. Beef, chicken, lamb, fish and veg- etables all benefit from the extra fla— vor that’s added from char-grilling. Dry rubs, marinades and sauces add flavor, seal in moisture and give a nice color. 0 MARINADES There are so many‘ in the stores to- day. It’s fun to experiment. Don’t over- marinate. This tends to draw out all of the juices. Fifteen to 30 gninutes on each side (refrigerated) is a good rule to follow. Discard marinade after meat is removed. Don’t reuse. 0 DRY RUBS This is the newest trend in grilling and adds an extra layer of flavor. Particularly good on “fatty” foods that take longer to cook, like spareribs, skin—on chicken and king salmon. You can make your own or try one of the variety of dry seasoning mixes now available. SAUCES Brush over toward the end of cook- ing, to glaze ~— but, be careful not to burn. Here are some excellent tips on r grillingfrorn-the book “Hot Barbecue” , by Hugh Carpentefand Teri Sandison. FOR CHARCOAL GRILLING: AlWays build a larger fire than you think you will need. The area of .FOOD FOR THOUGHT: - New NW cookbooks: “Cooking with Artisan Bread” by Gwen Reenacting an old—time automobile breakdown, Te Wednesday, June 10, 1998 Photo Illustration by Matt Brash'ears and Sharon Kramis/Mercer Island Reporter rry Jarvrs, mayor of Grace (near Woodinville), cooks up a steak on top of a spent wheel using Henry Ford’s invention, charcoal briquettes. the spread-out coals should be 2- to 4-inches beyond the food. - Always start your charcoal 30 minutes ahead of time. (You can add more as you need it.) Don’t use starter fluid! Many meals have been ruined by that “gassy” . tastes Use arr-electric starter or a char- coal chimney. Just be caréful to‘let them cool out of reach of children. - To prevent food from sticking, brush the clean grill with olive oil -—-— never use non-stick cooking spray. - C o o k 0 v r medium heat so that you grill, not char, the food. , - Don’t over- crowd the grill so that the food touch- es. ' Turn food sev- eral times during cooking to prevent burning on one side. 0 Keep a squirt bottle of water on hand to spray any flame flare—ups. - Use a clean platter for cooked foods. Here are “hot off the grill” recipes to enjoy when the sun is shining. SALMON: Buy a salmon “side” (half of a but- ‘ terfliedsalmon). Remove any bones and place ina foil “boat.” Leave the top open — don’t seal.Place on medium grill. Brush with the following sauce —— close hood and cook. Don’t turn. *Measure the width of salmon side at its thickest and figure 10 min- utes to the inch for cooking time. Salmon Barbecue Sauce 1 cubes butter 2 Tablespoons catsup 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 Tablespoon lemon juice Melt butter. Mix in remaining in- gredients and keep warm over low heat to keep sauce from separating. (If you’re grilling fillets, I’ve found it’s easiest to use a hinged grill bas— ket. Cook 3—4 minutes on each side.) BONELESSSKINLESS CHICK- EN BREASTS: Marinate 15 minutes in Ziploc bag, covered with whatever marinade sounds good to you. Some of the marinades I use for chicken are Huly Huly Sauce, Black Swan Orange Salad Dressing, or Rikki Rikki Asian Shoga—soy ginger dressing. Oil based salad dressings make good marinades for grilling. Please see Barbecue on C5 N.W. Food Newsletter: “Bon Vivant — a food review” is a well- researched, fun newsletter with recipes, restaurant reviews, wine recommendations and more. Annual subscription, $18. Send- to Bon Vivant, PO. Box 562, Bellevue, WA Bassetti and Jean Galton. (Gwen is the owner of Grand Central Bakery, home of those wonderful European style loaves of bread.) . “Northwest Berry Cookbook” by Kathleen Desmond Stang. ‘An excellent guide to the many varieties of berries in our region and how to‘use them 0 Northwest Travel Stop: Union Country Store at East 5130 Hwy. 106, Union, Wash. Catch the Winslow ferry and take a drive along beautiful Hood Canal. Don’t worry about packing a picnic, you’ll find everything you want'right here. Everything from fresh-made straw- berry cheesecakes, stuffed crab loaves and the best manicotti to chips and dips (and a great wine selection.) There are nice picnic parks close by. - NW Farmer’s Markets: . At the Pike Place Market, Organic Farmer Days begin June 17 and run through Oct. 28, two days a week, Wednesday and Sunday. Set up under new awnings on Pike Place between Pine and Stewart streets. Fill your basket with fresh picked locally grown organic produce from this “open market.” 98009. ’ ,0 Fresh strawberries: They’re here —-— EN— JOY! The season is always too short. - Summer Treat: Dick’s chocolate malted shakes are available in the ice cream section at QFC. Yuml! Iran into a good friend who steered me to the freezer section and pointed these out. She said, “when you get home, follow the directions on how to mix the shake, then hide in the bathrbom, so you don’t have to share.” Fresh & Fuzzy: A new flavor of Jello — Sparkling Wild Berry. Add sliced strawberries and blueberries (sugar—free.) ’ Mad ' About the Mouse’ Kevin Falk, a member of the Mercer Island , Children’s Choir, sings a tune’ from Disney’s “Jungle Boo ” in a medley called “Mad About the Mouse” at Emmanuel Episcopal Church Wednesday. The concert of the 84vvoice choir includes classical selections and musical and dance selections from Disney productions. The Children’s Choir will perform the con- cert at 2 and 7 p.m. on Sunday, June 14 at Whitman Middle School, 9201 lSthAve. N.W., in Ballard. Tickets are $8 for general seating and $15 for patrons. For tickets and information, call 232—8007. Matt Brasheau/Mflcer Island Reporter