Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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June 29, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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June 29, 1994
 

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game artist afantaSy/Bs _ club rivalry "keeps‘hea’rts. racing/Br , Roller hQCkey catching on * /B,; ItaREPORTER Wednesday, June 29, 1994 THIS WEEK Only a week out of school and your kids are complaining of nothing to do? Why not'have them get busy on some art projects? The Mercer Island Visu- al Arts League (MIVAL) has put out the call for art entries in its Junior Juried Art Show. it will be held during Summer Celebration, July 9 and 10, in the lobby of the First interstate Bank. The show is open to all students from kindergarten through high school. Cash awards will be given for paintings, drawing, crafts and photographs. Entries will be received between 10 am. and 4 pm. on Tues- day, July 5 in the bank lob- by, 3001 78th Avenue SE. Entry forms will be available at the bank. The juror for this year's show is Nadine O’Donovan , artist and Island resident. Have you noticed the ac- tivity at the corner of the PayLess parking lot? The Fourth of July is fast upon us, and the Kiwanis Club is selling fireworks again this year in its booth near the espresso stand by PayLess. Hours of sale will run from 12 noon until 9 pm. to— day through Friday, June 29—July 1; and from 9 am. to 9pm. on Saturday, Sun- day and Monday, July 2—4. The fireworks sale isthe Kiwanis Club’smajor fund- raiser, with the funds bene- fitting Mercer island organi- zatlons such as the Boys Girls Club, the Senior Pro— grams, and many more. These “safe and sane” fireworks may be used on Mercer Island from 11 am. until 11 pm. on the Fourth of July only. Look, up in the sky over the Central Business Dis- trict. . . it‘s the city‘s new Summer Celebration bal- loon, which will hover 150- feet over downtown, to help call attention to the festival, which runs July 8—10. There's still time to volun- teer to help out at Summer Celebration. To volunteer for a two-hour shift, call the vol- unteer coordinators, Nancy Clancy, 232—4323, Mary Ann Flynn, 232-7797, or Melanie Sproul, 232-8158. INDEX “ 24 pages 1 Four sections Vol. 41, No. 26 Business...............B2—3 Calendar Classified Editorial........,.........A6 Gleeb......»..............A2 Lifestyle..................C1 Obituaries...............A7 Records Sports Reporter telephone number'st News: 232—1215....Circulation:453—4240 Retail ads: 232-1215 . . . . . . . . . . . . ..C|assified 453—4186 Community Center plan needed Mercer Island, Washington Buildings > (mover Bu Art Gallery Andrea Marchese After more than a decade with a cloudy future, the Community Center at Mercer View may be more secure with a long—term lease and a long—range plan, which are being recommended by a local government committee. Ownership solution recommended A long-term. lease will allow the City to plan for center By Chris Norred 'Mcrcer Island Reporter Mercer Island officials should write an in—depth plan for the fu- ture of the community center, a special committee recommended last week. “It seems strange that we don’t have a long—range plan,” said Tom Weathers, chairman of p the Committee on Mercer View. After six months of study, the committee last week recommend— ed the City Council and School Board sign a 29—year lease to se— cure the center’s future and start the long-range plan for the center and the services provided there. The future of the Community Center at Mercer View has been up in the air for 14 years and city officials have been reluctant to plan for the future of a building they’di‘d’tiot own, Weathers said. On the other hand, it was more difficult to resolve theolwnership issue because City Hall lacked a long-term plan, Weathers said. His committee has been work- ing since early this year to re— solve the ownership issue. Details of the committee’s recommends tion were explained June 23 when the City Council and School Board met together. The council is expected to vote July on the recommendation. The School Board is scheduled to vote July 14. If approved, the su- perintendent and city manager will negotiate terms of the lease. The School Board last summer decided its old elementary school, which serves as the Community Center at Mercer View, was sur— plus property and could be sold to ~raise money for remodeling Mer~ cer Island High School. The City Council has leased the old school since 1980 and operates the community center there. Oil- iices of the Parks and Recreation A and Youth and Family Services are also there. The committee, headed by Weathers, a local mortgage bro- ker, was appointed to find a plan by which the City Council could buy the old school and keep the Community Center open. Instead of purchasing the old school outright, the City Council will negotiate a 20syear—lease, ac- cording to the committee’s plan. Lease payments will apply to- ward the purchase. The council may buy the school anytime dun ing the 20 years if funding be- comes available. Otherwise. the council may buy the school at the end of the 20 years for a nominal fee to be negotiated. The School Board will borrow money - equal to the $3 million- plus value of the old school -— and pay part of the cost for remodel- ing Mercer Island High. The lease payments will be set high enough to cover the School Board’s loan payments. The payments are esti- _‘matcd at about tantrum) a year. The interest rate on a separate loan most likelywill be slightly higher than if the School Board covered the full cost of the high school project with a voter-ap— proved bond issue, officials said. However. the amount of new taxes the School Board requests from Island residents will be less. “There is less impact to the vot— er.” said Mayor Judy Clibborn. “It will reduce the amount of the school bond absolutely," said Frank Morrison, 21 member of the committee. City officials say the $350,000 lease payments can be made within the existing city budget without cutting other services. But City Hall may be forced to de— lay some new projects such as trail construction, according to Rich Conrad, assistant city man— ager. According to the committee, a Please see ‘Center’ an Ad. City Council set to consider hike in garbage rates By Chris Norrcd Mercer Island Reporter Garbage ,rates may increase about 15 percent for Mercer Is— land households and somewhat less for Island businesses in July, under a proposal before the City Council. The rate increase is caused by two factors, according to city offi- cials. First. Eastside Disposal, the company that hauls island gar- bage, is raising rates to make up for revenue lost as many Island— ers in recent. years switched to smaller garbage cans. and paid smaller bills. while recycling more of their trash. Second, the King County Coun- cil is expected to raise the cost of dumping from $66 to $76.75 a ton in January. The Mercer Island City Council will vote July 5 on the rate in— crease. Only two Island residents raised questions about the in- crease during a public hearing be— Please see ‘Rates’ on A3. Some Islanders find alternatives to trash service By Chris Norrcd Mercer Island Reporter Some people take their trash to work. Some recycle almost all of it. Some enjoy trips to the dump. And some, illegally, take. their trash to the store. Residents in about 200 of the 6,700 houses on Mercer Island do not patronize the door-todoor gar— bage and recycling service of Eastside Disposal, the only com~ pany licensed to collect trash on Mercer Island, according to Glenn Boettcher, the solid waste coordinator at City Hall. Next week, when the City Council votes on a rate increase expected to be 15 percent, some Islanders may it there is a cheaper way to get rid of the gar- hage. Many regular garbage custom~ ers assume that hauling their own trash would be cheaper. But that is not necessarily true, says Boettcher. And even the mini- mum cost of $9.28 per vehicle for selfshaulers at the King County disposal sites will increase to Please see 'Alternatives on A3. Photos by Andrea Marchese urging out ofthe neighborhood The 50—year—old Eyring house, an eastsidc waterfront home on Mercer Island, was sep— arated from its foundation June 24 and moved by barge to a new site on Hood Canal. The two-story, 3400—square—foot house, which weighs over 175 tons, will become a permanent home for a Bellevue family who bought the structure from the new property owner. In photo at left, the house from Butterworth Road waits‘aboard its barge for a tug boattto tow it away. In photo at right, the house passes north of the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge. A completely new home will now be built on the Mercer Island site. One neighbor, who watched the project evolve, commented, “The move is an engineering feat w and it’s nice to see a good house find a new home.”