Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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June 29, 1994     Mercer Island Reporter
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June 29, 1994
 

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Wednesday. June 29,1994 Marble joins firm Mary Anne Marble has joined the John L. Scott Real Estate of— fice on Mercer Island. Marble is originally from Seattle, and previ- ously worked as a legal secretary. Johnson promoted Robert W. Johnson has been named first vice president at Smith Barney Shearson. Johnson joined FE.F. Hutton in 1984. E.F. Hutton was later bought by Shearson Lehman Brothers, which merged with Smith Barney to create Smith Barney Shearson. Prior to joining the firm, Johnson taught market- ing and communications at the University of Illinois, Illinois State University, and the Univer- sity of Wisconsin. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and his doctor- ate degree in marketing and com- munications, all from the Univer- sity of Illinois. He lives on Mercer island with his wife, Heather, and his sons, Derek and T. Claes. Graybeal joins firm Foster Pepper & Shefelman has announced the expansion of the firm’s intellectual property practice with the addition of Lynne Graybeal, partner, practicing in the firm’s Seattle of- fice. Graybeal has more than 10 years of experience in intellectual property matters, including trademark selection, US. and for- eign trademark prosecution, com— puter software and technology li- censing, content licensing, trade secret protection, copyright pro— tection, licensing and registra— tion, and book publishing. She previously chaired the Intellectu- al Property Groups at both Riddell, Williams, Bullitt & Walkinshaw, and Stokes, Eitelbach & Lawrence. She is a past chair of the WSBA’s Intellectual and Industri- al Property Section and has been an Adjunct Professor of Trade— mark and Unfair Competition Law at the University of Washing— ton. A cum laude graduate of the University of Puget Sound School of Law, Graybeal received her undergraduate degree, cum laude and with distinction, from Colby College. Her parents are John and Janice Graybeal of Mercer Is- — V. wWfi.‘ land. Clinic announces new office hours Virginia Mason Mercer Island has announced new hours for the clinic’s internal medicine depart- ment. The hour change brings consistency between the recently merged internal medicine and pe- diatrics departments. Beginning July 5, both internal medicine and pediatrics at Virgin- ia Mason Mercer Island will be open 8 .m. to 7 pm. on Mondays and Tuesdays; 8 a.m. to 5 pm. on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fri- days; and 8:30 am. to noon on Saturdays. Internal medicine physicians may be reached by calling 232-8460, while the pediat- rics department phone number is 232-3456. Magic. . . Continued from 82. savings account, he said. “So you can’t really say I’m a million- aire.” The house is only a few doors from his parents, on the same block where he grew up on Mer- cer Island. The hardwood floors are still being refinished, but Myrfors already moved in sculp- tures of gargoyles and demons. He lights the candles over the fireplace mantle and relaxes on his sofa with ice tea. He wears a long—sleeved, black, pirate’s shirt, black jeans, and black biker boots. His long, straight hair hangs to his belt. . If appearances count, he might make a good sorcerer. As he talks, it becomes clear that aside from financial success, Myrfors appreciates the chance to reply to people in his past who said that Dungeons and Dragons and fantasy art were a silly waste of time. “I was always interested in be- ing an artist. I wanted to be a fan- tasy artist. Everyone told me there was no money in it.” In junior high school, he start- ed playing fantasy games, mostly Dungeons and Dragons, and he barely passed art class. He con- tinued to play the games in high school, occasionally tinkering with computers and always read- ing books, but otherwise finding few passionate interests. “I didn’t really get serious about school un- til my senior year. I‘always got low grades.” kinky»: Now when calling He graduated from Mercer Is- land High in 1984, worked in book stores and attended Cornish Col- lege of the Arts on Capitol Hill in Seattle. After art school, he found Wiz- ards of the Coast, a company headed by Peter *Adkison in the basement of a home in Kent that was producing a fantasy, role— playing game book. Myrfors sent his portfolio. They rejected it. “It was dark, moody stuff,” he says. But he doggedly pursued the company. “I went to the offices all the time, even though I was not being paid.” Eventually, they gave Myrfors some freelance assignments. But the company was struggling. Then Wizards of the Coast met Richard Garfield, a math profes- sor at Whitman College in Walla Walla. According to Myrfors, the meeting took place via computers on the Internet. Garfield, a prolific young game inventor, needed a compa- ny to market, distribute and pro- duce Magic. A draft version of the game was created, and soon, ev- eryone in the Wizards office was addicted to playing. Without money to produce the game, Myrfors and his colleagues began seeking investors. He was in charge of art and production. He still was not paid. But he ac- cepted ownership shares instead. “It was my dream job. I knew Magic was coming. We were all addicted to playing it around the office. I had a lot of faith in it.” At first, the company intended to use old art for the cards, per- haps reprinted from books. But Myrfors had another idea. “I was determined we would do it all with original artwork. I had a lot of friends who were art— ists. “A lot of the artists were in the same boat I was. Their families told them they could not make a living doing fantasy art.” He established a pay rate of $50 for each illustration, plus $50 worth of stock in the company for the artists. It took him a year to accumulate the art for the first edition of the game. Now in the fourth edition, the game includes cards with about 800 different illustrations, Myrfors said. The illustrations in— clude landscapes, such as islands in the fog and shadowy forests, and characters, some of which are spooky demons, others are Casino prress Hir Service by *500 Slots *Blackjack *Roulette *Craps *Keno *Sports Bar *Poker Room *Live Entertainment *Fine Dining *Cocktails *Sports Book (Las Vegas Odds Betting) l 800) 258-8800 or 70 Resewotionists on (Jth 7 dogs/week Some iestrlctions Rpplo Fair's and dates subject to chnnqe neo LION INN Gt CHSINO i ELKO NEVHDII mythical heroes and heroines. Each card includes the name of the artist. Although some of the artwork is dark and spooky, Myrfors said he tried to avoid gore and sexism. “I didn’t want it to be another woman-in-chainmail-bikini game. Role playing games have a repu- tation for being sexist. A lot of companies target their games to appeal to 12-to—18-year-old white males. I want this game to appeal to everyone. “I’m happy when women tell me they like the game and are not offended by the art.” The cards, like baseball cards, have become collectors’ items. One collector card has sold for $200, Myrfors said. The game is popular at Microsoft, where 50 or 60 people play it regularly. “L Boeing $50 FUN a GBMING *Round Trip Airfare *Ground Transportation *Fun Pak valued at $13 *Champagne in—flight *Free Cocktails while Gambling except in Poker Room 78-1826 “"‘l Mercer Island Reporter Bri iYour Bib, Bite Bucks & Friend To Support Q Northwest Harvest Mk»,- o is} 0 outstanding restaurants 0 live acts 0 delectable food product companies Purchase tickets in advance at any Bartel] Drugstore and receive a Bite Buck, $1.00 OFF COUPON good toward the purchase of any food or beverage item. PROCEEDS OF REDEEMED BITE BUCKS GO TO NORTHWEST HARVEST. Adults $3, Juniors 13-16 $1.50, a three day pass $5.00. Kids 12 and under are always FREE. 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