Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
Click to learn more!
July 22, 1981     Mercer Island Reporter
PAGE 1     (1 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 22, 1981
 

Newspaper Archive of Mercer Island Reporter produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2021. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




John LusHg writes about weddings, both royal and common Page A4- Aaaaah Masseuse rubs customers the right way Page B5 I I I I I II I III I I In I iii i i -- i i i Ill A Your con Volume 28 Number 29 Mercer Island, Washington I 30 Ceres Wednesday. ,July 22. 1981 t O' By TERE8A WIPPEL Stating that "this will be one of our tougher years," Mercer Island School District Superintendent Craig Currie released the pro- posed 1981-82 district budget to the school board during its July 16 meeting. The budget, set at $11,525,049, is down 1.8 percent from last year's $11,745,803 amount, Currie said. The superintendent told the board that the budget maintains the district's certificated staffing level at 60 per thousand students, and provides for all services and programs offered during the 1980-81 year, with the exceprion of certain support services. Reduced services are develop- mental reading, elementary li- brary, elementary physical edu- cation and elementary general music. Reductions were necessary "in order to preserve class size in the regular academic class- rooms," Currie said, adding that "proportionate reductions were alto made at the secondary level," reriuemarily to cover enrollment S. In his budget address, Currie noted that one area in question is that of staff salaries, relating to the passage by the 1981 State Leg- isiature of House Bill 166. The Mercer Island School District, still in the process of negotiating sala- ries with the Mercer Island Edu- cation Association, is limited by liB 166 to giving raises of 3.79 per- cent, certificated, and .0031 per- cent, classified, for 1981-82. "No money was provided in the legislature's biennial budget for tmbstitute pay, extra curricular stipends, or sick leave cash out," Currie said. "The latter alone could have an unfunded liability as great as $150,000 during the 1981-82 budget year." In addition, a $770,980 portion of the proposed budget will remain uncertain until Sept. 15, the date that a special Building and Capital Projects Fund Levy will be put before Island voters. If passed, the $1.4 million levy. collected over two years, would be Art~ Betty Woolley 84 Classified ads B7-9 Editorial A4 islandwatch 135 Lifestyle B 1-5 used for the renovation, replace- ment and rehabilitation of district buildings. The board approved the levy try after the passage of House Bill 650, which shows school dis- tricts to use building fund money for maintenance and capital ex- penditures. School district officials are opti- mistic that the levy will be ap proved, but admit that failure of the measure would necessitate se- vere budget cutbacks. The budget is still subject to change -- pending further infor- marion received from the State Superintendent of Public Instruc- tion -- before it is voted upon by the board during a public hearing Aug. 27. Copies of the budget are avail- able to the public at the switch- board in the school district admin- istration building and at the Mercer Island Public Library. IN OTHER ACTION, the board: approved employment agree- ments and the salary schedule for administrative staff members and confidential employees for 198 1-82; held an executive session to dis- cuss three personnel items; acknowledged the receipt of a letter from Henry Rybus, execu- tive secretary of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Associa- tion (WIAA). The letter, written to high school principal Larry Smith, offers a date of Aug. 5 for an ap- peal hearing regarding the WIAA's decision to place Mercer Island High School on probation for the 1981-82 school year. Board president Gretchen llgenfritz indi- cated that she and other district administrators would accompany Smith to the hearing, which will be in Long Beach, WA. The board recessed after the ex- ecutive session, and met again this mormngat 7:45 a.m to take ac- tion on the rehiring of other certi- ficated staff members on continu- ing contract who had received RIF notices. The next board meeting will be Thursday, July 30. On the Record A2 Religion 134 Sally' s Galley B2 Sixty-Plus 133 Sounding Board B3 Sports A7-9 I Cooper was the tour-legged star of the show at Island Crest Park last Friday, when the Mercer Island Park and Recre- ation Department presented a "Catch and Fetch" demon- stration with Pete Fayette and his dogs. Upper left, Cooper makes a mid-air catch. Upper right, Fayette gives his part- ner a deserved rest. Above. Jesse Arner tries his ,/kill. with Cooper ready for action. See related phi,los on B I (Photos by Dave Ekren) By ERIC STEVICK Carolee Anne Kempton was ner- vous as her plane circled around the Tucson, Arizona airport. The attractive middle-aged Mercer Island woman was the last person to leave the airplane and she walked slowly. She was greeted by an older woman who introduced herself as Florence Hill. The two exchanged small talk between long moments of silence. The luggage was 45 minutes late and Kempton was feeling more and more uncomfort- able. She had a right to be nervous. She had not seen her natural moth- er since she was put up for adop- tion at birth. That mother-and-eh/Id reunion took place two years ago. Since then, they have met twice. They plan to meet again later this sum- mer. "I still don't can Florence 'mother.' I love my adopted moth- er and father. I will always consid- er them my real parents," Kemp ton reflected last week, sipping a cupof toa. "Florence ht a kick-- a real nice lady. I Just can't call her my moth- er." Kempton, of Mercer Island. rtad the mreh for her mother lhree and ow-ha]f years ago after CAROLEE KEblPrON watching the special television se- ries "Roots" and reading a news- paper article about the Washing- ton Adoptive Rights Movement (WARM). A mainly volunteer organization based in King County. WARM helps adol ted people and natural parents find their families, with a 97 percent success rate. With the help of WARM volun- teers and Jeanne Creighton, a close personal friend from Seattle who would later serve as a media- tor between the different parties, Kempton was able to piece togeth- er her puzzling family tree in a year and a half. She started the search with "ab- solutely nothing" to go on. She did not even know her mother's name With no place to start, why did she even try ? "Curinusity, mainly." Kempton said. "You get to the time in your life when you really should know.who your natural parents were." Kempton learned of her adop lion from a girl friend when she was 14. "It was one of those 'I know something you don't know' situa- tions," Kempton said of her friend's less-than-subtle revela- tion. The starting point in Kempton's search was Salt Lake City. Utah. and the Mormon Church where she was left for adoption Like many other agencies holding personal informaUon, the Mormon Church would not release any information without a court order Jim Kempton, Carolee's hus- band and a lawyer by profession, persuaded a Salt Lake City judge to allow his wife's records be opened, The original Kempton birth cer- tifwate was in the flies. The certif- icate revealed the name Florence Hill, Kempton's natural mother But the first positive piece of in- formation was deceiving Three Florence Hills had been living in Salt Lake City in the mid-1930s, around the time of Kempton's birth Enter Marllyn Dean, a WARM volunteer who served as a confi- dential Intermediary, While at a convention in Washington DC. Dean used the national capitol's library to locate the Salt Lake City city directories descrabing individ- uals living there from 1934 to 1940 Dean compiled the former ad dresses of the three Florence Hills and the names of the people resid- ing on their blocks during that time period From there. Creighton. acting as an unofficial confidential inter- mediary, started trying to locate the Hills' former neighbors It was a long process. Creight- on's initial efforts proved fruitless She had been able to locate two of the three Florence Hills. one in California and the other in Idaho Neither one would claim the ma- ternal Ue. Perserverance proved para- mount Creighton finally dialed the magic number The key connec- tion was 80-year-old Helen Buck- well. who remembered Florence Hill as a parttime maid and baby sitter. Buckwell also remembered the last name of "that boy from Midvale" who turned out to be Hill's l~)yfrlend and Kempton's fa ther Buekwell's testimony, followed by more research through public records~ opened new avenues in Kempton's search for her natural parents Creighton oht;l;.vd the phone nunlber of the third l"l.rence tlill from a daughtel in taw now living in Tacoma "I knew Immediately it ~a~ ('arolee's mother' ('retghton said of her phone call to Florence ||Ill in the spring of 1979 "When ! asked her tf Sept 27 ~Kempton date of birth~ meant anything to her, she said 'No. it means lloth ing' But then she started asking questions about Carolee The mm ute she started asking questions 1 knew it was her " Cretghton didn't pressure Hill into admitting she was Kempton's mother She merely left her with Kempton's address and telephone number. Two days later, Kempton re- ceived a telephone call from her natural mother They exchanged photographs and set up their ini- tial meeting in Tucson At last, Kempton knew her herl tage ~he I~ S~I>~ and Ncolll',h Oil her mother,~lde ,stld .It,~t~h qJn her tatht'r > ~lt.~t'red she had two halt hrother~ arid a hall sister tm her mothvl ~Ide, anti a half brother anti a |l~tl[ ~l>ter on hel ialht,l ~, side Kt'lflph)n al>o h, artwd lilt' tl aglt! story of her in()thcr ~ early lift, Hill t~rev~ up In l)oVvrl~ ,%hc lost all eye In a ha~, rld at'chh'ttt whe she wa~, t'lk~hI Nht' vouhhI t talk until shc ~a~, I/ at ~ht('h time a doctor dt~('.vt,rvd ~IIHI lt'lno~,cd a lump front her totL~ll~ Xt 17 ~he aJso bevamc pre~nan! b~ her first real friend. ('alt)h,v ~ father t!n lortunatt.ly, tllll ~ hwrtd had been enga~/,d It) ollothvr ~tl] IOl a year and a half tie married the girl two In<,t~th~ alter t'ar(,h.v s birth Kempton has ne~er ~islted her natural father. ~h. i~ under the impression ~he wa~ ttever born. Even so, Kempton has talked with her half-brother and half-sis- ter from her father's side Her half brother convinced Kempton to keep a low profile, fearing that her revelation might have an ef- fect on his parent's marriage. T~o years after her reunion m the Tusco airport. Kempton is re- lieved the search is over. "It's nice not looking for people who look like you on elevators," she quipped ,See related story, Page AS~