Newspaper Archive of
Mercer Island Reporter
Mercer Island, Washington
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December 31, 1970     Mercer Island Reporter
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December 31, 1970
 

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MIReporter, Thurs Dec. 31, 1970 Page 2 DITOR'S,;.CORNER Our children's Christmas card collection, intended as greetings to the community ir~ last issue, brought messages to us as welL. The drawing that socked it to us was that chosen by Pat McGaughey at Se~=First. This was the crayoned depiction, by fourth-grader Julie Lindberg of Mercer Island Covenant Church, of the manger scene with a trumpetting angel floall~ng in the dark sky above and saying, "Don't be afriad." (The spelling is Julie's.) Don't be afriad? When abroad bombsa~'e dropping, napalm is roaring, and the daily "progress" report is in "body count"? When our young taunt us, many hate us? When we sink into economic depression, while prices soar out of reach? When greed and carelessness are destroying land, water, fish, birds, animals? When the physical law, that nature abhores a vacuum, seems repealed where our leadership is concerned? Don't be afriad, w- "And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for behold, I bring you good tidings of g~at joy, which shall be to all people. "For unto you is born a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying: "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men." (St. Luke I1: 10.14. Julie, you write on good author=ty. All right, we will not be afriad. Happy New Year, everyone! Island Reporter PUBLsSHED EVERY THURSDAY PO. BOX 458. MERCER IS4JtNO. WASHINGTON 98040- AD 2-1215 Published weekly, and ~lcond-closs postage paid at Mercer Is/and, Washington, 98040. Subscription rates $9 per y~r, $4.50 six months, .75 month. STAFF: Peggy Reynolds, Editor-Publisher; Sue Daum, Assistant Editor; Sally York, news; Vivian Eddy, Advertising Director; Judy Mickel, Charlotte Steiner, office; Err Bass, n, Circulation. DEADLINES: Organization and social news, Thursday noon. Letters, Friday 5 p.m. Other news, Monday noon. ADVERTISING DEADLINES: Classified, Tuesday I0 a.m.; Display, Class Display, Too Late to Classify, Tuesday 3 p.m. TELEPHONES: Advertising and news, AD 2-1215 Circulation, GL 5-2222 STREET ADDRESS: R2836 78th S.E. ~ behind Lola's Gifts) NEW YEARS OAM To 8PM Skinless Weiners By Peggy Reynolds While the kids talked revolution, in 1970 Morn and Pop themselves engaged in a rather extensive rumble. For 1970 should go down in history as the Undevelopment Year. It marks the first clear break with the American ethnic, the assumption that building bigger means building better, and that the more we build, the better lives we construct. In 1970 we heard a screeching of brakes, here as well as throughout the nation. In setting Mercer Island on a shaky but unmistakably new track, three major movements are revealing of designs for the 1970's. These are the citizens' widespread revolt against paving over the north end with Interstate- 90; the Moss-Ralston proposal; and a general revulsion toward public works and buildings, coupled with a tightening of the pursestrings. THE DOOR WAS OPENED in the fall of 1969, when the electorate overwhelmingly defeated a golf course proposal, a project which official Mercer Island had taken somewhat for granted. Also taken for granted had been the original 1-90 design, an elevated monstrosity of up to 14 lanes, which had been approved by City and Town Councils and their municipal engineers in 1967 with scarely a murmur from the public. And taken for granted as well had been the prospect of filling up the Island with homes and humans, where eventually the roofs would out-number the trees. Coupled with this was the assumption that our neighborhoods would become swathed with concrete and asphalt, that the delicate geologic and botanical balance of our hillsides must be destroyed by the bulldozer, and that we must commit many millions to school construction to meet an eventual population more than a third greater than we now have. changed drastically. The citizen's voice is heard, the sanctity of his home and the beauty of his surroundings do count. An aroused and fair-minded leadership has coupled with citizen concern to secure a design team for what we fondly hope will be an entirely new approach to 1-90. The Moss-Ralston proposal, to integrate open spaces with community development, while in its entirety probably utopian, will certainly establish a new approach to government, a new concept of its responsibilities, and a new citizen awareness of our enviornment. Residents of a south end area, moved no doubt by fiscal considerations but also by environmental concerns, in 1970 killed a proposed (Continued on Page 3.) Community Calendar r THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31 NEW YEAR's EVE New Year's Eve Dance, 8 p.m Mercer Island Beach Club FRIDAY, JANUARY I, Lq71 HAPPY NEW YEAR! MONDAY, JANUARY All open gyms begin (see schedule sports page). Community Council, 7:30 Justice Court, CRy Hall TUI~DAY, JANUARY 5 Park Advisory Board, 7:30, City Hall Rotary, 12:15, Royal Fork Toastmasters Club, 6:30, Royal Fork M.I. High School Basketball - high school gym - vs. Lake Washington WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6 Planning Conmcc, a'on, 7: 30, City Hall THURSDAY, JANUARY ? MIVAL, ROYAL FORK, 7 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. business - open to new and prospective members. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8:30 Emmanuel Episcopal Church GOING INTO 1970, all this is changed, and t' I TD o, omsp. r ,y ] " "gEA6-EdR * WRITE Femily's Trees Teken Iv Chlq.rs Editor Mercer Island Reporter Dear Fellow Mercer Islanders, Behind our home on Holly Lane is a woods which is kept in a natural state and which represents many, many hours of labor for our whole family. It contains some large and choice rhododendrons and some lovely, although after each Christmas, fewer, evergreen trees. This year a beautiful eight to ten foot the summer, I was reqmreu w buy for the neighbor, with my own money, enough to replace what 1 had taken. How many of us parents take the time to teach that kind of lesson? We have never received an apology for the loss of our trees and other vegetation, much less been offered reimbursement. The many areas of natural vegetation make our island a choice spot; perhaps we should take a moment to make sure our children understand Christm In Tahiti Jim, Jan and Len Skoog, the three Mercer Island brothers adventuring on their 30-foot sloop in the South Pacific on their way around the world, told of low prices in their most recent correspondence. In the Marquesas, a loaf of French bread cost ten cents, coconuts and breadfruit were five cents, and big, foot-long oval-shaped doughnuts were 10 cents, Len said. While in Taiohae Bay at Nuku-Hiva, the largest island in the Marquesas, Len wrote: "Canned food is expensive except for canned milk and butter from New Zealand. For washing the boat and clothes we have to carry water out (to the ship) in the rubber raft, five gallons at a time. There is a cold water shower on shore celebration, and then go to Moorea to visit one of Jim's friends from Mercer Island High School, Jack Risser. The Skoogs have sailed a total of 8,~8 miles since they left home. In Papeete, they tied up with 20 other yachts from all over the world, including one couple from Vancouver, Canada. Their next mail stop will be in New Zealand. The address is Jim, Jon and Len Skoog, General Delivery, Auckland, New Zealand. On the way to Papeete, the Skoogs stopped and visited some atolls in the Tuarnotu group where they went skindiving and took underwater slides. A fifth grade teacher in Seattle, is using the Skoogs' voyage as a spruce was cut by a Christmas tree seeker; last year, two firs were taken by neighbor boys to help decorate their school. As a child, I picked some corn, still green, from a neighbor's yard and took it to my mother as a present. She left a party she was giving, marched me around to the neighbors, and supervised my embarrassed apology. Furthermore, when corn came on the market later in that all land is owned by next to the pie, which we use someone. And perhaps we daily without mrge. would all do well to remind our children now and then (and perhaps ourselves) that a respect for the property of others is only right and fair if we are to expect others to have that same respect for the things we care for and value. Sincerely yours, / s/Mary Ann Wiley Mary Ann Wiley Mrs. Robert L. "A few cla" ; before there was a whale nat followed us for several ~ ms. He was as big as the oat and stayed behind abou 75 feet." The bro! ,ers arrived in Papeete, T: aita on December 21, and r~ :eived their first mail sinc Acapulco. They spent Chr tmas in Papeete, will stay or a New Year's geography lesson for her class. Reasonable Rates- Insurance included N IT-A-C J Rent-A-Ford from Foothills Fwd FREE DELIVERY OF WOODY S MEATS PLAZA MEATS AND RUDY S BAKERY WITH YOUR GROCERY ORDER 15000 Sunset Highway SH 7-3100